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Dean Verkuil Gives Ellis Island Papers to Library
Class of '01 and First LL.M. Degree Candidates Enter Cardozo
Students & Alumni Can Access On-Line Legal Opportunities
Golove Joins Faculty and Schwartz Returns
Three Join Cardozo Board
The Heyman Center Inaugurates New Programs
Intellectual Property Law Program Expands
Cardozo/BMI Moot Court Competition
Scholars Discuss Nondelegation Doctrine
Music and Legal Theory Explored
Panel Discussion on Neonaticide Held
Derrida Panel Discussion on Forgiveness
Festival Latnio Dancers
Monrad Paulsen Competition
Impeachment Debate


Dean Verkuil Gives Ellis Island Papers to Library
Paul Verkuil, dean and professor of law, began his duties at Cardozo on April 1, 1997, the day after he submitted his report as Special Master in the original jurisdiction Supreme Court case of New Jersey v. New York. Subsequently, the Court accepted Dean Verkuil's recommended legal conclusions, ruling 6 to 3 that New York has sovereignty over the original island (about 5 acres at low tide), while New Jersey gained sovereignty over the landfill added after 1891 (about 24 acres). The Court referred the case back to Dean Verkuil to draw new boundary lines between the two states, a process that is in its final stages. Dean Verkuil has given his papers related to the case to the Dr. Lillian and Dr. Rebecca Chutick Law Library. An inventory of the papers is available on the library's web site: www.yu. edu/cardozo/lawlib/.

Class of '01 and First LL.M. Degree Candidates Enter Cardozo
Class of 01 Fall Cruise  The class of 2001 began the fall semester with a cruise of Manhattan harbor, leaving Chelsea Piers on an afternoon that may have been the most beautiful of the season. Entering in August were 253 men and women armed with the highest average GPA in the School's history: 3.33. Applications were up for the third year in a row, with nearly 2100 applying for entry. The availability of housing in Cardozo's residence hall may have contributed to this being one of the most geographically diverse classes ever: students come from more than 30 states. The median age is 23; 20 percent are 27 or older. Women make up 53.4% of the class; nearly 18% are students of color, with approximately 7% Asian, 6% African- American, and 5% Latino. Students in the class of '01 come from dozens of undergraduate institutions: 20 come from NYU, making it the school with the most representation; Yeshiva is second with 17; Columbia and University of Michigan are tied for third with 12 students each; and Rutgers is fifth with 11. SUNY Binghamton, University of Wisconsin, and University of Pennsylvania were next with eight students each.
Students arrived on the first day of classes with advanced degrees in taxation, political management, medicine, genetics, psychology, forensic science, pathology, and business. Many came with experience in other fields; among the entering class is an accountant, author, pilot, chef, police officer, teacher, television network news producer, musician, doctor and two professional baseball players.
The first 16 LL.M. candidates began their studies at Cardozo in August as well. Nine-six of whom are Cardozo graduates-are in the Intellectual P 1000 roperty program. Others come from Loyola in Los Angeles, UCLA, and City University in London. The seven students enrolled in the General Studies program are all foreign students, coming from Australia, Israel, Nicaragua, Russia, Switzerland, and Venezuela.
First LLM Class Among the first 
students in the LL.M. Program are 
(standing from left) Nadia Desyatnikova, Randi Rosen, Efrat Lev, Karen Abramson, Tim Shepard. 
(Seated) Roberta Kraus, Angela Kirtlan, Ketryn Saliba-Dumith.
Students & Alumni Can Access On-Line Legal Opportunities
Through a new program offered by the Center for Professional Development, Cardozo students and alumni can now access job opportunities 24 hours a day from any computer with Internet service. Additionally, by completing a personal profile, they can automatically be notified by e-mail of positions that meet their identified needs. EmplawyerNet, which offers this job placement service as well as links to other law-related websites like Lexis-Nexis and the National Law Journal, a legal employment on-line newsletter, and a career library that includes national data bases of prosecutors, public defenders, and public interest jobs. Current Cardozo students are offered membership free; alumni can join for $7.45 a month by calling 800-270-2688 or by contacting the company at www.emplawyernet.com.

Golove Joins Faculty and Schwartz Returns
David Golove  David Golove, an expert in constitutional and international law, was named associate professor of law this summer. He comes to Cardozo with experience in both academe and private practice: he taught at the University of Arizona College of Law for several years, prior to which he was a partner at the firm Rabinowitz, Boudin, Standard, Krinsky & Lieberman in New York. "I had an interesting practice in constitutional and international law, but I ultimately prefer to be in an academic setting where I can take a longer view of legal questions," he said.
This fall he is teaching Civil Procedure and the International Law Practicum. His interests take him outside the classroom as well-in October and November, he moderated panels on human rights in Israel and Turkey organized by the International Law Society. Pleased to be a part of the Cardozo community, Professor Golove remarked,  "I am struck by the vibrancy and intellectual commitment of the faculty and the high quality of the students."
This winter, New York University Law Review will publish Professor Golove's article "Against Free-Form Formalism," in which he debates with Prof. Laurence Tribe constitutional procedures for approving international agreements. He also will present a paper on the constitutional separation over the war powers in January at the University of Colorado. At present, he is researching another article on John Rawls' theory of international justice.
Professor Golove received his J.D. from the University of California, Boalt Hall; clerked for the Hon. Marilyn Hall Patel of the US District Court for the Northern District of California; and received an LL.M. from Yale Law School, where he was a Ford Foundation Public International Law Fellow. He is co-author with Bruce Ackerman of Is Nafta Constitutional? (Harvard University Press, 1996).
William Schwartz  University Professor William Schwartz, who served for many years as vice president for academic affairs, Yeshiva University, is now teaching full-time at Cardozo. He is teaching three courses: Property, Torts, and Estate Planning. Pleased to be back, he said, "I am enjoying the stimulation of the classroom and the give and take with the students. They 1000 are a bright and creative group." Professor Schwartz is the former dean of Boston University School of Law; general director of the Association of Trial Lawyers of America; a member of the Legal Advisory Committee of the New York Stock Exchange; chairman of the Legal Advisory Board, National Commission on Medical Malpractice; and a representative (NGO Section) to the United Nations. He is currently a member of the board of UST Corp., and a member of the advisory board of WCI Steel Inc. Professor Schwartz is the author of 18 books and more than 50 law review articles.

Three Join Cardozo Board
Kathryn O. Greenberg '82, founder and director of the New York Legal Assistance Group; Thomas H. Lee, president of Thomas H. Lee Company; and Barry Shenkman, president and treasurer of the Jacob Burns Foundation, have been elected to the Cardozo Board of Directors. "These distinguished new members will enhance our current board and help strengthen Cardozo as we continue to move forward to the front ranks of law schools," said Dean Verkuil.
Ms. Greenberg is a cum laude graduate of Cardozo and a former supervising attorney at the Bet Tzedek Legal Services Clinic. A seasoned trusts and estates lawyer, Ms. Greenberg developed the New York Legal Assistance Group, of which she is now chairman of the board, to provide free legal assistance to the elderly, the disabled, battered women, immigrants, and others unable to afford legal representation. Current Cardozo students work at NYLAG as part of the Bet Tzedek Community Services Clinic. Ms. Greenberg is on the board of the Hospital for Special Surgery and the advisory board of the Women's Committee of the Central Park Conservancy, and is active in numerous other charitable activities. She holds a bachelor's degree from the University of Colorado.
Prior to founding the Thomas H. Lee Company in 1974, Mr. Lee was associated with First National Bank of Boston and was a securities analyst at L.F. Rothschild. Mr. Lee serves as a director of numerous public and private corporations including Finlay Enterprises, Inc. and Vail Resorts, Inc., and is a former director of Snapple Beverage Corp. He is also a trustee or overseer of a number of civic and charitable organizations including Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Brandeis University, Harvard University, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, NYU Medical Center, and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York. Mr. Lee is a 1965 graduate of Harvard College.
Mr. Shenkman is a grandson of Jacob Burns, the late, former board chairman of Cardozo's Board of Directors. In addition to holding positions with The Burns Foundation, he is vice president of Burns Management Group, an advisory director of the Metropolitan Opera, and a member of the Metropolitan Opera's Investment Committee. Mr. Shenkman is a graduate of Fairleigh Dickinson University.

The Heyman Center Inaugurates New Programs
It has been one year since Prof. Lawrence Cunningham became director of The Samuel and Ronnie Heyman Center on Corporate Governance. The Center, known since its inception in 1987 as a venue for symposia and lectures by well-known business leaders and legal academics as well as a resource for students and faculty, has expanded to include a number of initiatives that now make the corporate law program one of Cardozo's crown jewels. Under Professor Cunningham's leadership and with the continued support of the Heyman family, the Center has placed the Law School at the forefront of discussions about corporate law.
This fall, several students entered the Law School as the first Heyman Scholars, receiving merit scholarships, academic guidance in the field of corporate law, and access to summer internships. The first two-week intensive summer program in England, co-sponsored by the Heyman Center and the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies at Oxford University, was fully subscribed, and those Cardozo students who participated reported that it was an invaluable and uni 1000 que experience. Professors Yablon and Cunningham were there to run the program and teach. Oxford Campus
Heyman Scholars Heyman Scholars with professors Schroeder, Cunningham, Yablon, Newman; Dean Herz; and Robert Schwartz, director of admission.
David Darst and Dean Verkuil
David Darst and Dean Verkuil
The Center provides opportunities for an exchange of views in corporate and business law. The newly named Heyman Center Lecture Series kicked off with a lecture by David M. Darst, managing director, Morgan Stanley Dean Witter, who spoke on "Innovation in the Capital Markets: Globalization and the Next Generation." Two weeks later, a big audience turned out to hear Heyman Center sponsor Samuel Heyman, chairman and chief executive officer, GAF Corporation, and an honorary member of Cardozo's Board of Directors, on "From Courtroom to Boardroom: Proxy Wars, Takeover Battles, and Corporate Governance." In November, Lewis Solomon, Theodore Rinehart Professor of Business Law, George Washington University Law School, was the Center's distinguished scholar-in-residence. He taught a three-week mini-course and delivered a faculty lecture, "Reflections on the Future of Business Organizations." Samuel Heyman
Samuel Heyman
Intellectual Property Law Program Expands
Variety and depth have been the hallmarks of Cardozo's Intellectual Property Program, made possible by the vitality and incredible scholarship of the four full-time faculty members who specialize in this area. In the past six months, the events and speakers that have been presented and the addition of the Master of Laws program have insured the program's continued growth.
Last spring, the 1998 Cardozo/BMI Entertainment and Communications Law Moot Court Competition brought 17 teams from around the country to Cardozo to argue a case on copyright infringement on the Internet. The Cardozo Moot Court Honor Society organizes the event each year and does not compete. Judges for the final round bench, who ruled John Marshall Law School the winning team, were Judge Pierre N. Leval, US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit; Judge Jacques L. Wiener, Jr., US Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit; and Prof. Mark A. Lemley, University of Texas, Austin.
Prof. Jane Ginsburg, 
Columbia Law School
Stephanie Cuba
(from left) Prof. William Patry, Senior Judge Jon O. Newman, Prof. Marci Hamilton
Jane Ginsburg
Stephanie Cuba '99 introduced the panelists for "Art, Distribution, and the State."  Behind her is Roberto Bedoya, executive directory, National Associaton of Artists' Organizations
(click for a larger photo)
"End of Public Domain or a Necessary Step to the Future? Protecting Databases in a Post Feist World" was the subject last spring discussed by June Besek, partner, Cowan, Leibowitz & Latman, P.C.; Prof. Jane Ginsburg of Columbia University School of Law; Roger Zissu, partner, Fross, Zelnick, Lehrman & Zissu, P.C.; and Prof. Marci Ha 1000 milton, director, Cardozo Intellectual Property Program. Prof. William Patry moderated. This fall, Senior Judge Jon O. Newman, US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, presented "A Judge's Perspective on Substantial Similarity" at the annual Tenzer Distinguished Lecture in Intellectual Property. This was followed by a reunion of former members of the Cardozo Arts & Entertainment Law Journal (AELJ).
A couple of weeks later, AELJ sponsored "Art, Distribution and the State: Perspectives on the National Endowment for the Arts." Panelists from various areas of the arts discussed the issue of censorship and last year's US Supreme Court ruling that the organization may consider a "standard of decency" in making grants.
Professor Hamilton spoke on "Copyright and the Constitution" at the first annual program luncheon. She addressed an audience of more than 100 prospective and current J.D. and LL.M. students, faculty, alumni, AELJ board members, and members of the IP legal community, including representatives from BMI and companies and firms that sponsor IP externships.

Cardozo/BMI Moot Court Competition
BMI Competition  BMI, an organization dedicated to the protection of the rights of writers, composers, and publishers of music, again hosted a reception for teams competing in the Cardozo/BMI Moot Court Competition. The Moot Court Honor Society coordinates the event in which 20 teams compete. (from left) Prof. Stewart Sterk, the Competition's faculty adviser; Dana Auslander '98; Theodora Zavin, BMI senior vice president and special counsel; Tara Fisher '98; Rebecca Mendel '98; and Michael Liddie '98.

Scholars Discuss Nondelegation Doctrine
The constitutional nondelegation doctrine, which appears to be experiencing a revival among legal academics and even among members of the Supreme Court who were then preparing to hear a case involving New York City's challenge to the President's exercise of the line item veto to cut Medicare funding to New York City, was discussed last spring at an all-day conference sponsored by Cardozo Law Review. "The Phoenix Rises Again: The Nondelegation Doctrine from Constitutional and Policy Perspectives" brought scholars from across the country for panels on Delegation and Democracy; Delegation and the Constitution; Delegation and the Legislative Process; and Delegation: What Should We Do About It? Dean Verkuil, Dean Michael Herz, and Prof. Marci Hamilton were among the participants. According to Professor Hamilton, "the conference initiated serious scholarly discussion that I hope will chart the parameters of debate."

Music and Legal Theory Explored
Music and Legal Theory

What do music and law have in common? Can music change the law? What can historical changes in music tell us about concurrent changes in the law (or vice versa)? Legal and social theorists, musicians, cultural anthropologists, and other experts in the fields of law and music convened in April for the first forum to investigate these questions. "The Modes of Law: Music and Legal Theory-An Interdisciplinary Workshop" was co-presented by Cardozo and the Mannes College of Music/New School University, and sponsored by Jacob Burns Institute for Advanced Legal Studies; Howard M. Squadron Program in Law, Media and Society; and Cardozo Law Review. Panels, dinner, and musical performances rounded out the two-day program.
Interest in the relationship of law to music has grown out of the law and literature movement-scholars keep moving further afield in search of new veins of interdisciplinary ore. At the same time, postmodern legal theory has yielded a resurgence of interest in aesthetics generally, arguing for a new understanding of law and the arts as mutually constitutive forces. "The Modes of Law" participants examined law in 1000 relation to music as a natural extension of these avenues of scholarship. For example, music and law are both text-bound and performative discourses. A focus on the nature of musical interpretation offered fresh insights into questions of legal interpretation. In addition, panelists evaluated music's special, and often feared, place in political rhetoric, the reasons for music's social and cultural impact, and how to apply musical theories to the structure and aesthetics of law.
Panelists spoke with remarkable passion as they searched for unities and differences between music and law. Papers by professors from the US, Australia, and Greenland included "A Love Supreme: Race, Jazz & Legal Theory;" "Woody's Guitar: Folk Music as a Social and Political Force;" "Fabricating Authenticity: Law Students as Country Music Stars;" and "Sacred and Secular: What Can Music Teach Us About Conflicts and Negotiations in Traditional Jewish Life?" The conference was organized by David Caudill, visiting professor; Prof. Desmond Manderson, Macquarie University, Australia; and Prof. Monroe Price.

Panel Discussion on Neonaticide Held
Neonaticide Panel  A panel on "Neonaticide: The Psychiatric, Legal, and Ethical Dimensions in Defense of Women" brought to Cardozo Stephen Scaring, Esq., criminal defense lawyer (left) and Dr. Margaret Spinelli, director, Maternal Mental Health Program, New York State Psychiatric Institute and assistant professor of clinical psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. Prof. Ellen Yaroshefsky (center) moderated. The event was sponsored by Cardozo Women's Law Journal, the Jacob Burns Ethics Center, and the Cardozo Health Law Association.

Derrida Panel Discussion on Forgiveness
Forgiveness Panel Having recently returned from South Africa, where he studied the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, philosopher Jacques Derrida suggested that he speak on "Forgiveness and Mercy in Politics and Law" at his annual Cardozo address. The Commission was created as a way for South Africa to come to grips with its past without resorting to expensive and politically divisive trials and to aid in the healing process by offering amnesties to those who confessed atrocities and crimes against man. At Cardozo, members of the clergy and a Jewish law scholar shared ideas and philosophical differences with Professor Derrida on legal and moral contours of forgiveness.
Co-sponsored with the New School University, the conversation was organized and moderated by Prof. Michel Rosenfeld. Shown here are the panelists with Dean Verkuil. (From left) Rev. Dr. James Forbes, Jr., Senior Minister, Riverside Church; Prof. Suzanne Stone; Professor Rosenfeld; Professor Derrida; Dean Verkuil; and Msgr. William B. Smith, St. Joseph's Seminary, Yonkers, NY.


 
Festival Latnio Dancers
Festival Latino Dancers Every spring the Latin-American Law Students' Association hosts the Festival Latino. Spanish food, music, and dance lessons make the event one of Cardozo's most popular social events. A highlight of last spring's event was a performance by merengue dancers from Santo Domingo.
Monrad Paulsen Competition
Paulsen Competition The Moot Court Honor Society began the season with the annual intra-school Monrad G. Paulsen Competition. The distinguished panel of judges for th 468 e final round bench included Lawrence M. McKenna, US District Judge for the Southern District of New York; Edward D. Re, chief judge emeritus, US Court of International Trade, and Sidney H. Stein, US District Judge for the Southern District of New York. The winner of the final round was Reuben Levy (at right). Mark Korn (center) was the runner-up. Jaimie Rothman (at podium) won Best Brief.

Impeachment Debate
Impeachment Debate  Mark Green, New York City Public Advocate (at podium), came to Cardozo to debate Prof. John O. McGinnis (at right) on "Resolved: America Should Elect an Impeachment-Free Congress." (Green took the affirmative position.) The debate was sponsored by the Howard Squadron Program in Law, Media and Society and The Nation Institute. Victor Navasky (center), editorial director, The Nation, moderated the well-attended event, which took place the week before the national elections. Both sides claimed victory. 0