5a6 Around Campus   1000
around CAMPUS

Justice Breyer Visits Cardozo
Kaufman Delivers Bauer Lecture on Justice Cardozo
Students Bring Activists to Campus
Conference Looks at Both Sides of Religious Liberty Legislation
Students in Tax Clinic Fight the IRS and Win
Visitors Enrich Spring Semester
Chinese New Year Celebration
Goodrich and Engler Named to Faculty
10th Anniversary Symposium for Cardozo Studies in Law and Literature
Moot Court Team Ends Year with Wins
Music Professionals "Teach" Class in Contract Drafting and Negotiation
Ethics Talk Covers Gattica, Bertrand Russell, and DNA Databanks
Commissioner Safir Discusses Serial Rape
Students Launch New Journal Online
IP Program Ranks High
Cardozo Wins Diversity Award
Argentina and Cardozo Cooperation Explored
Cardozo/BMI Entertainment and Communications Law Moot Court Competition
Panel on Kurdish Rights
SBA Auction Raises more than $20,000 for Public Interest Stipends
Discussion Panel on Proposed UCC Article 2B and Federal Database Protection Legislation
Tigar Speaks on Distortions in the Search for Justice
Heyman Center Winter Lecture Series
Correction


Justice Breyer Visits Cardozo
Justice Breyer
Last November, legal scholars and judges from around the world convened to examine cutting-edge issues in constitutionalism and human rights. The three-day conference opened at Cardozo with US Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer delivering a paper on the Court's 1998 fact-finding trip to European courts; other panelists discussed how to apply constitutionalism on a global scale. They also investigated the role of constitutionalism in light of a worldwide trend for governments to give more power to private agents and companies.
New York University and Columbia University Law Schools were the venues for the subsequent days of "Constitutionalism, Constitutional Rights & Changing Civil Society," which was telecast by C-Span and co-organized by Prof. Michel Rosenfeld, who is an officer in two of the sponsoring organizations: the US Association of Constitutional Law and the International Association of Constitutional Law. The conference also was sponsored by the three participating law schools. At Cardozo, participants included  Dean Paul Verkuil; NYU professor Norman Dorsen, president, US Association of Constitutional Law; Thomas Fleiner, president, International Association of Constitutional Law; Louis Henkin, Columbia Law School; Frank Michelman, Harvard Law School; Shlomo Avineri, Hebrew University, Jerusalem; Judge Charles Fried, Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court; and H.W.O. Okoth-Ogendo, University of Nairobi, Kenya.

Kaufman Delivers Bauer Lecture on Justice Cardozo
 
Andrew Kaufman signs his book for Cardozo Law Review's Brian Waldbaum, editor-in-chief, and Larissa Paule-Carres, symposia edi

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tor.
Andrew Kaufman signs his book for Cardozo Law Review's Brian Waldbaum, editor-in-chief, and Larissa Paule-Carres, 
symposia editor.

   Last June, Judge John Noonan, Jr. wrote in The New York Times Book Review that the "much-awaited publication of Andrew L. Kaufman's Cardozo (Harvard University Press) is a major event in the world of law, judicial biography, and legal literature." Kaufman presented the annual Uri and Carolyn Bauer Lecture this fall, speaking on "Cardozo and the Art of Biography," which will be published in the next issue of the Cardozo Law Review.
   Kaufman, the Charles Stebbins Fairchild Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, began by noting his pleasure in reestablishing a connection with Cardozo Law School; he had published an article, "Cardozo's Appointment to the Supreme Court," in the first issue of Cardozo Law Review, nearly 20 years ago. He then spoke of Cardozo's legal education and career as a practicing lawyer, while elucidating his own role as a biographer. Benjamin Nathan Cardozo, Chief Judge of the New York Court of Appeals from 1926 to 1932 and Justice of the US Supreme Court from 1932 until his death in 1938, is especially noted for his pathbreaking common law opinions for the Court of Appeals, his brilliant and distinctive writing, his social consciousness, and his ability to reconcile innovation and precedent.
   The idea to write Justice Cardozo's biography was proposed to Kaufman by Justice Felix Frankfurter, for whom he clerked in 1956-57. Kaufman said "yes" immediately because he was interested in doing biography and no thorough book on Cardozo had been written, yet it took 40 years for the Kaufman book to be published.
   Kaufman entertainingly described the many difficulties he encountered in his research. To illustrate, he explained that when Cardozo moved to Washington, D.C., he gave St. John's Law Library a collection of briefs and memoranda from his 23 years as a trial and appellate lawyer. Apparently the library lost them, and because they have never been found, Kaufman tried to reconstruct those years by painstakingly looking through New York Reports, and looking for every case that had Cardozo's name on it. This took almost a year of plodding work. Once the online legal research database Lexis was developed, Kaufman did a duplicate search that took only 45 minutes! After reading Cardozo's briefs dating back to his first year at the bar, Kaufman was astonished to discover that he did not observe a progressive development of Cardozo's finely crafted writing style. He said "his brief writing ability appeared nearly full-blown at the outset of his career."
   Kaufman was more fortunate in researching the Justice's legal education. Cardozo, who had a photographic memory and could speed-write, reproduced and preserved Columbia Law School class lectures verbatim, leaving a fairly complete record of his professors' views and a rare look at legal education a century ago.
   In discussing the ethical questions that arose in the undertaking of the Cardozo biography, Kaufman said that he tried to be fair to his readers by giving them a complete picture, and to Cardozo, who was an exceedingly private man who burned much of his correspondence and papers. Kaufman said he was careful not to speculate about Cardozo's personal life and sought to understand it only as it shed light on his legal contributions. Kaufman was curious, however, as to why Cardozo never married, wondered about his religious beliefs, and tried to understand how damaged Cardozo was by the disgrace of his father resigning from the bench amidst a Tammany Hall corruption scandal.
   The lecture came to a close with a selection of Ka 1000 ufman's favorite Cardozo quotations; they were a reminder of the Justice's unique voice.

Students Bring Activists to Campus
Rev. Al Sharpton
Rev. Al Sharpton
This year the Cardozo Law & Politics Society and the Black, Asian, and Latino Law Students Association (BALLSA) have been especially energetic in presenting panels on topical subjects such as police brutality, human rights, and legal activism.
Just hours after a Bronx man was shot at 41 times by 4 police officers, and before the story broke in the press, the Rev. Al Sharpton spoke to about 300 Cardozo students on "Police Brutality and the Giuliani Administration." He addressed the need to remedy what he described as an escalating problem in New York Cityˇ"Crime is down, but police brutality is up." He suggested ways to reduce police brutality, including giving more power to the Civilian Complaint Review Board, making it mandatory for NYC police officers to reside in the city, providing better training for officers, bringing in federal prosecutors if a case does go to trial, and making it impossible for officers to waive a jury trial.

(from left) Prof. Andrew Hacker, Prof. E. Nathaniel Gates, and John Garvey
Andrew Hacker, E. Nathaniel Gates and John Garvey
The student groups also co-sponsored "The Concept of ŰRace' in the New Millennium: Transformation or Abolition?", a scholarly discussion of race and its relevance in scientific and social analysis that brought together Andrew Hacker, professor of political science, Queens College, and author, Two Nations; Prof. E. Nathaniel Gates; and John Garvey, new abolitionist and editor, Race Traitor.

Ron Kuby
Ron Kuby
Ron Kuby was among the lawyers who spoke at "Fighting City Hall: Activist Lawyering in Giuliani's New York City." He and Norman Siegel, executive director, New York Civil Liberties Union; Bill Goodman, legal director, Center for Constitutional Rights; and Roger Wareham, legal counsel for the Million Youth March, discussed how to mount legal challenges to what they presented as Mayor Giuliani's efforts to squelch free speech and activism. Leslie Brody '83, co-chair, New York City Chapter, National Lawyers Guild, a sponsor of the event with the Law and Politics Society, moderated.

"Domestic Abuses: Critiques of US Compliance with International Human Rights Norms" featured panelists Ward Moorehouse, Council on International & Public Affairs; Daniel Shanfield, Lawyers Committee for Human Rights; and Gabriel Torres and Peter Weiss, Center for Constitutional Rights. Prof. David Golove moderated. The Law & Politics Society was the sponsor.

Conference Looks at Both Sides of Religious Liberty Legislation
Since the US Supreme Court ruled in 1997 that the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) was unconstitutional, thanks in part to Prof. Marci Hamilton's successful argument, several state legislatures have enacted laws modeled on the federal RFRA. The issue has even become a campaign issue, with Governor George Bush, whose eye is on the White House, endorsing a bill in Texas.
These new laws are supported in part by a large and diverse coalition of religious and civil rights organizations, making bedfellows of The Rutherford Institute and some state civil liberties unions. In opposition are neighborhood groups, child advocates, and the National League of Cities, whose objections include the fear that th 1000 ese laws might undermine other civil rights protections. Last summer, Congress considered the proposed Religious Liberty Protection Act (RLPA), which would reinstate the RFRA regime. Among opponents of the federal legislation are the Home School Legal Defense Association (whose president helped draft the original RFRA) and the National Trust for Historic Preservation.
In February, the Cardozo Law Review brought together legal scholars and some of the key participants in the current debate for a daylong conference, "State and Federal Religious Liberty Legislation: Is It Necessary? Is it Constitutional? Is It Good Policy?"
One highlight was a panel devoted to the real-world impact of religious liberty legislationˇan issue that, according to Professor Hamilton, was not debated sufficiently prior to RFRA's enactment. Representatives of the American Civil Liberties Union, The Rutherford Institute, and The Aleph Institute, an organization that protects the rights of Jewish inmates, argued in favor of RLPA and the various state initiatives. Taking the opposite stance were representatives of the National League of Cities, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and the Chaplain's Office of the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction. People for the American Way Foundation and Amicus for Children's Healthcare Is a Legal Duty, Inc., groups that had been deeply involved in RFRA's creation, indicated new reservations.

Students in Tax Clinic Fight the IRS and Win
(from left) Andrew Zucker, Prof. Hedy Forspan, and Maria Celis
Andrew Zucker, Prof. Forspan and Maris Celis
Fighting the Internal Revenue Service, especially in the US Tax Court, is considered to be a losing battle and certainly one that strikes fear in most US citizens. However, this fall, Cardozo students Andrew Zucker and Maria Celisˇboth of whom were in their last semester of legal studiesˇtook a seemingly unwinnable case that came to the Cardozo Tax Clinic and proceeded to beat the IRS.
Their client, Haji Uddin, a Pakistani immigrant and a security guard at New York University, had claimed the earned income credit (EIC) for his cousin's two children while his cousin's entire family was living with him. The IRS disallowed the credit and refused to settle.
In January, special trial Judge Robert N. Armen, Jr. of the United States Tax Court found in favor of  Zucker's and Celis's client in Uddin v. Commissioner of the IRS, Doc #2866-98S. Judge Armen's decision established new precedent for the interpretation of eligibility for the EIC.
The story of how the two soon-to-be lawyers worked closely with their professors and colleagues in Cardozo's Tax Clinic to win the case illustrates how well the Tax Clinic has fared since it was founded by the late James Lewis, a giant of the tax bar and a professor at Cardozo. The Clinic, supervised since 1992 by Prof. Hedy Forspan, handles approximately 200 cases annually, most of which are resolved administratively in audit or appeals or settled in negotiations with an IRS attorney.
At the trial, when the judge called a conference just prior to summation, it seemed clear to both sides that he was going to find in favor of the IRS. Zucker, a veteran of Cardozo's Intensive Trial Advocacy Program (ITAP), presented arguments in chambers that were so persuasive that Judge Armen decided to give the disputing parties 30 days to file briefs.
In a team effort, all 16 students in the Tax Clinic worked on the case for the next 30 days. They researched the law and legislative history, and all of Judge Armen's previous decisions. Then, with professors Stewart Sterk and Forspan, Zucker and Celis wrote and edited the brief and submitted it for decision. The judge informed both parties that they could expect a decision by November 1999; however, he ruled 1000 in just five weeks.
Zucker and Celis agreed that "the information and skills learned in all the special programs at Cardozo, the help of Professors Forspan and Sterk, plus the energy, time, and assistance of the other students in the Tax Clinic made it possible for us to win this case."
Celis is now working with the New York office of Neville, Peterson & Williams, which specializes in international trade and customs litigation. Zucker began a job in March at the Bronx District Attorney's office.

Visitors Enrich Spring Semester
The spring semester saw visits by several professors. Shlomo Avineri of the Hebrew University returned and taught a seminar on Hegel and one on nation-building and ideology in Israel. Rochelle Dreyfuss, director of NYU's Engelberg Center on Innovation Law & Policy, and a teacher of intellectual property and civil procedure there, was a scholar-in-residence. Michel Troper, who teaches constitutional law at Paris X (Nanterre) and often visits Cardozo, taught a three-week mini-course on French public law. In addition, three professors from law schools in the area taught as academic adjuncts: Dan Burk of Seton Hall taught Cyberspace Law; Nina Crimm of St. John's taught Federal Tax; and Jeffrey Hass of New York Law School taught Corporate Finance.

Chinese New Year Celebration
Chinese New Year Celebrations
For the first time since it was founded in 1991, Asian Pacific Islanders American Law Students Association (APALSA) organized a celebration of the Chinese New Yearˇthe year of the Rabbit.

Goodrich and Engler Named to Faculty
Peter Goodrich, founding dean of the department of law, Birkbeck College, University of London, has been appointed professor of law at Cardozo beginning fall 1999, announced Dean Paul Verkuil. At present, Professor Goodrich is Corporation of London Professor of Law at Birkbeck College, where he teaches contracts, torts, legal methods, and legal theory among other courses. He received an LL.B. degree in 1975 from the University of Sheffield, England and a Ph.D. in 1984 from the University of Edinburgh.
According to Dean Verkuil, "With the appointment of Peter Goodrich, the program and faculty in legal theory and philosophy, which is already first-rate, is now unparalleled."
Professor Goodrich has written extensively in the areas of law and literature and semiotics. He has authored eight books and has two more forthcoming: Histories and Theories of Law: A Textbook in Contemporary Jurisprudence (with Costas Douzinas), to be published by Oxford University Press, and The Laws of Love, to be published by Cambridge University Press. He is editor of the International Journal for the Semiotics of Law and editor-in-chief of Law and Critique.
Mitchell L. Engler, who has been acting assistant professor at NYU School of Law for two years, has been appointed associate professor of law. From 1992 to 1997, Engler was an associate in the tax department of Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson; he was an associate at Davis Polk & Wardwell in 1991. He holds a B.A., a J.D., and an LL.M. in taxation from NYU. He was on the editorial staff of the NYU Law Review and the Tax Law Review and is a member of the Order of the Coif. Professor Engler will teach Corporations and a variety of tax courses beginning in the 1999-2000 academic year.

10th Anniversary Symposium for Cardozo Studies in Law and Literature
David Margolick
David Margolick, contributing editor at Vanity Fair, delivered the keynote address at a symposium commemorating the 10th anniversary of Cardozo Studies in Law and Literature. "Theaters of Justice and Fictions of Law" invited practitioners and scholars from 1000 around the world to discuss the theory and practice of law as theaterˇor the storytelling of justice. Panelists looked at the seminal scholars of this movement, the impact of law on ancient and modern forms of theater, and the central notion of law as performance. The event was co-sponsored by the Journal, The Jacob Burns Institute for Advanced Legal Studies, and the Law and Humanities Institute.

Moot Court Team Ends Year with Wins
Once again, the Moot Court Honor Society had a banner year in interschool competitions. Two teams competed in the Ruby R. Vale Moot Court Competition at Widener University Law School. The team composed of oralists Sonny Chehl and Rebecca Duewer won the competition in final arguments before the Chief Justice and Associate Justices of the Delaware Supreme Court. This was the first time Cardozo has won this competition. Oralists Nathaniel Ginor and Seth Kaufman advanced to the quarter-final round. Gregory Dell and Michael Hoffman were bench memorandum writers; Atul Joshi and Eric Stern were team editors.
In another victory, Cardozo won for the second year in a row the Nassau Academy of Law competition. Oralists Erica Busch and Sean Parmenter and bench memorandum writers Joshua Fine and Sandi Greene worked with team editor Rob Wallack.
For the first time, Cardozo competed in the Giles Sutherland Rich National Intellectual Property Moot Court Competition, where they advanced to the semi-final round. Reuben Levy and Daniel Schnapp were the oralists; Deborah Cynn and Jared Shapiro were bench memorandum writers. The team editor was Hillary Schaeffer.
In the Domineck L. Gabrielli National Family Law competition, oralists Erin Naftali and Ellie Rivkin, assisted by bench memorandum writers Jennifer Davis and Perry Krinsky and team editor Vered Adoni, advanced to the quarter-final round.
The Cardozo team advanced to the sweet-sixteen round of the Irving R. Kaufman Memorial Securities Law competition. Jaimie Rothman and Mark Korn were the oralists. Debbie Rubino and Stephen Romagnoli were bench memorandum writers, and Elizabeth Kase was the team editor.

Music Professionals "Teach" Class in Contract Drafting and Negotiation
Michael Reinert (standing) and Edwin McCain
Every year, Prof. Michael Reinert (standing), invites professionals in the music industry to "teach" a class in Contract Drafting and Negotiation. This year "Anatomy of a Recording Artist: A Look at the Developments and Career of Edwin McCain" featured the singer/songwriter (seated) and Dean Harrison, Harrington Management; Jason Flom, president, Lava/Atlantic Records; and Evan Lamberg, executive vice president, EMI Music.

Ethics Talk Covers Gattica, Bertrand Russell, and DNA Databanks
In Cardozo's darkened Moot Court Room, students watched an early scene from the futuristic film Gattica. In the film's world, the genetic material of unborn children can be manipulated to subtract all negative tendencies and create a near-perfect human being. The film's protagonist, however, was not genetically programmed and was born with imperfections. His parents respond very differently to him and his "perfect" brother, basing their child-rearing behavior on each child's genetic expectations. The lights came back on, and Prof. Barry Scheck began the Jacob Burns Ethics Center lecture "Privacy: The Impact of DNA Databases."
"This film shows that with too much knowledge, a danger of genetic determinism arises. It is this issueˇdenial of an open futureˇthat underlies our fears about DNA testing," Professor Scheck said. "Imagine if the CIA could have tested Ronald Reagan's DNA," he continued. "They may have seen he had a gene for Alzheimer's disease and not allowed him to run for president."
Despite the possibilities for abuse, unwarranted surveillance, eugenics, and all manner of invasions of privacy, Profes 1000 sor Scheck ardently believes in the responsible use of DNA for forensic identification.
He would like to see more DNA testing at crime scenes right after the crimes are committed. It can help link apparently unrelated crimes to the same perpetrator and generate leads at the beginning of an investigation. He advocates carefully constructed legislation to protect civil liberties and limit DNA databank use to forensic identification only.
As a crime-fighting tool, DNA databanks can be very effective. Professor Scheck discussed how the British have invested resources and utilized this powerful tool far more aggressively than American authorities. Essentially, they use DNA the way US law enforcement uses fingerprintsˇas a universal identifier. In the UK, the police create a DNA profile for everyone arrested for either a misdemeanor or felony. They compare it to databank samples gathered from other crime scenes and try to make a match. If no conviction follows, the DNA is presumably expunged.
The statistics for the UK DNA databanks bear witness to their power as a crime-solving tool. Each week, 300 to 500 matches are made, and to date 36,454 suspect-to-crime scene "hits" have been made.
In the US, investigators can take DNA only from inmates who are convicted of violent felonies and sex offenses or from individuals if they have a court order showing "probable cause." In the UK, the turnaround time for lab results is 7 to 14 days, whereas in the US, results can take 3 to 10 monthsˇa long time to wait if you are innocent and can be exonerated by the sample. Because of limited resources here, there is a tremendous backlog of collected but untyped samples as well as more than a million "owed" samples (people on parole or probation for violent felonies from whom DNA samples should, but have not been, collected). There are also thousands of untyped rape kits and many old, unsolved homicides where DNA testing could make a difference. In addition, the statute of limitations allows evidence to be destroyed after five years. "To destroy such powerful clues is a big mistake," said Professor Scheck, noting that Cardozo's Innocence Project relies on preserved evidence.
Constitutional questions have been raised about methods of DNA gathering. Sometimes investigators find DNA evidence that is "abandoned" from a discarded cigarette butt, for example. This method raises concerns about potential law enforcement abuses with "pretext arrests" designed to obtain DNA samples surreptitiously and thereby skirt Fourth Amendment protections against unreasonable searches and seizures.
Other questions include what will be done with blood samples from convicted offenders after the DNA from them has been extracted and entered into the databank. Today, they are preserved as backup, but Professor Scheck believes they should be discarded to prevent their use for purposes other than crime solving. The armed forces, medical research labs, hospitals, the genome project, commercial labs, and blood banks, and many private employers have DNA databases that are used for various purposes.
Scheck warned that the use of DNA databanks should be limited to protect civil liberties. "Keep in mind," he said, "the words of Bertrand Russell. ŰPragmatism is like that warm bath that heats up so imperceptibly that you never know when to scream.'"

Commissioner Safir Discusses Serial Rape
(from left) Dr. Casey Jordan, Assemblyman John Ravitz, Commissioner Howard Safir, and Susan Hendricks
(from left) Dr. Casey Jordan, Assemblyman John Ravitz, Commissioner Howard Safir, and Susan Hendricks
Though homicide and crime rates in general are down in New York, serial rape is up. Dr. Casey Jordan, a criminologist from John Jay College of Criminal Justice, opened up the panel "Serial Rape" discussing the consequences of rape and s 1000 haring personal reflections.
Dr. Jordan said rape differs from other crimes because it terrorizes a community and changes the victims' lives permanently. "A rapist does not spend a life in prison, but the victim pays a life sentence of trauma. The effect is extraordinarily severe, and the emotional and psychological damage cannot be quantified.


The panel, which also featured NYPD Commissioner Howard Safir; NY State Assemblyman John Ravitz; and Susan Hendricks, director of litigation, Criminal Defense Division, Legal Aid Society, focused on a bill sponsored by Assemblyman Ravitz, whose district includes Manhattan's Upper East Side, haunt of the notorious "East Side Rapist," who is believed to have raped 14 women in the past two years alone. The bill would mandate that persons convicted of two or more rapes against different victims serve consecutive terms of imprisonment. Current law allows the judge to order concurrent terms of three to six years.
The State Senate has passed Ravitz's bill two years in a row; yet it has not reached the floor of the House. Ravitz blames Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver for inaction and hopes that the bill's bipartisan support and pressure from the public will finally push Silver to bring it to the floor.
Hendricks expressed reservations about the proposed legislation. In particular, she objects to the loss of judicial discretion it would entail. Dr. Jordan, who supports the Ravitz bill, believes also that these rapists need rehabilitation while incarcerated, to curtail their well-documented high rate of recidivism.
Commissioner Safir indicated that he, too, supports this legislation. He urged that DNA samples be taken from all arrestees, noting DNA's usefulness as a forensic identification tool, especially in cases of serial rape.

Students Launch New Journal Online

This spring, the Law School launches a new publication: the Cardozo Online Journal of Conflict Resolution. Students initiated the project and will have the first issue online soon. Editor-in-chief Jed Melnick noted, "The challenge will be to combine a serious academic journal that fully utilizes the internet and its interactive capabilities." The journal will get a significant boost from a generous contribution from the Kukin Foundation, YU President Norman Lamm announced recently. "The Kukin support of the online journal will significantly enhance Cardozo's growing dispute resolution program," said Prof. Lela Love, director of the Kukin Program for Conflict Resolution. "Scholars, students, and practitioners will have a new venue to exchange ideas in this field."
The journal also presented its first symposium: "Teaching a New Paradigm: Must Knights Shed Their Swords and Armor to Enter Certain ADR Arenas." Panelists discussed whether teaching mediation in law school imparts a different vision of lawyering that will require advocates to have new strategies and skills. Participants were (from left above) Peter R. Robinson, Pepperdine University School of Law; Kimberlee K. Kovach, University of Texas Law School; and Professor Love. Not shown: Robert A. Baruch, Hofstra University School of Law; and Carol Bensinger Liebman, Columbia University School of Law. A transcript of the proceedings will be available at the Journal's website: www.yu.edu/cardozo/journals/conresj.

IP Program Ranks High
Every year, US News and World Report ranks the best graduate school programs in the country. In this year's issue, dated March 22, 1999, Cardozo was ranked ninth in the country for its Intellectual Property Law program. These rankings are based on a survey of law school faculty who 1000 teach in the field. Franklin Pierce Law Center in New Hampshire and University of California-Berkeley tied for number one, while Columbia tied for third and NYU tied for fifth.

Cardozo Wins Diversity Award
The Council of Legal Education Opportunity (CLEO) honors law schools that have shown a commitment to helping minority students. At a reception held during the AALS conference in New Orleans, Cardozo was one of 38 law schools presented with a CLEO Diversity Award. "This is particularly gratifying, given our efforts to increase minority enrollment at Cardozo," said Robert Schwartz, director of admissions. "Today, more than 20% of the student body are students of color." CLEO, a widely recognized and respected organization for minorities in legal education, sponsors regional pre-law summer institutes and counsels, and functions as an information clearinghouse for thousands of students.

Argentina and Cardozo Cooperation Explored
Dr. Herbert Dobrinsky, Baruch Tenembaum, Ambassador McGough, Dean Verkuil and Prof. John McGinnis
Ambassador G. J. McGough, Consul General of Argentina, visited with Dean Paul Verkuil to explore the possible cooperative efforts between Cardozo and law schools in Argentina. He also met with several professors. (From left) Dr. Herbert Dobrinsky, vice president for university affairs and meeting liaison, businessman Baruch Tenembaum, Ambassador McGough, Dean Verkuil, and Prof. John McGinnis.

Cardozo/BMI Entertainment and Communications Law Moot Court Competition
BMI Moot Court Panel
This year, 28 teams from 22 law schools participated in the annual Cardozo/BMI Entertainment and Communications Law Moot Court Competition. Cardozo's Moot Court Honor Society members, who do not compete, write the Competition problem, organize and plan the event. BMI, an organization dedicated to the protection of the rights of writers, composers, and publishers of music, hosts a reception at their offices. Theodora Zavin, BMI senior vice president and special counsel, said "It is BMI's hope that this Competition helps sensitize tomorrow's lawyers, legislators, and judges to the vital importance of the law of intellectual property." Final round judges were (from left) Hon. Andrew J. Peck, United States Magistrate Judge, Southern District of New York; Hon. Stephen F. Williams, US Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit; and I. Fred Koenigsberg, Esq., White and Case, L.L.P.

Panel on Kurdish Rights
Edip Yuksel
The Kurds are a minority group who live in the mountainous area of Eastern Turkey. They make up approximately 20% of the Turkish population and as a group have been subject to discrimination and other abuses. "Human Rights and Democracy in Turkey under International Law," sponsored by the Cardozo Journal of International and Comparative Law, brought together a group of human rights activists and legal experts just as the Kurdish People's Party leader Oculan was captured by Turkish commandos in Nairobi, Kenya. The panel participants were Edip Yuksel (above), a Turk and Kurdish national who is a prominent lawyer and human rights activist; Dr. Thomas Christiano, professor of philosophy, University of Arizona; Gregory Fox, senior fellow, Orville H. Schnell Jr. Center for International Human Rights, Yale Law School; Dr. Paul Magnarella, professor of law and anthropology, University of Florida; and William Pfaff, international affairs columnist, International Herald Tribune.

SBA Auction Raises more than $20,000 for Public Interest Stipends
   At the Seventh Annual Goods and Services Auction, a dinner 1000 with the dean, a trip to the Delaware courts with professors Larry Cunningham and Charles Yablon, and a jog around the park with Prof. John Duffy were among the items that helped bring the total amount raised to more than $20,000. The money goes to funding Cardozo Public Interest Stipends.
   According to Mitch Kleinman, president of the SBA, "There was a large group of students who worked very hard to put together a great list of live and silent auction items, as well as a terrific raffle. Our hope is that next year we will have additional support from the students and alumni alike to insure that the total is even higher." Each year, approximately 90 students apply for stipends of $3,250 to enable them to take public interest summer internships that pay no salary. Typically one-third of this number are awarded the grants.
Robert Schwartz
Robert Schwartz, director of admissions and 
Dean Verkuil buying raffle tickets (below).
Dean Verkuil

Discussion Panel on Proposed UCC Article 2B and Federal Database Protection Legislation

The third floor lounge was packed to capacity for "Information in the Digital Age: Licensing, Selling and Using Information Under the Proposed U.C.C. Article 2B and Federal Database Protection Legislation." The discussion focused on reconsideration of two questions: how intellectual property products should be licensed and whether the data in such works should be treated like property. The resolution of both issues will significantly impact the distribution of wealth derived from intellectual property. Speakers were (from left) Raymond T. Nimmer, Leonard H. Childs Professor and director, Information Law Program, University of Houston and reporter to the Drafting Committee on U.C.C. Article 2B, National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws; George A. Cooke, vice president and chief counsel, Home Box Office; Justin Hughes, attorney-advisor, Patent and Trademark Office, US Department of Commerce; Prof. Marci Hamilton (moderator); Robert W. Gomulkiewicz, senior corporate attorney, Microsoft Corporation; Jane C. Ginsburg, Morton L. Janklow Professor of Literary and Artistic Property Law, Columbia Law School; and Pamela Samuelson, professor, School of Information Management and Systems and School of Law, University of California at Berkeley. The panel was co-sponsored by the Intellectual Property Law Program, the New York City Bar Committee on Copyright and Literary Property, the Cardozo Arts & Entertainment Law Journal, the Intellectual Property Law Society, and the Jacob Burns Institute for Advanced Legal Studies.

Tigar Speaks on Distortions in the Search for Justice
Michael Tigar
"The US Constitution was conceived to guarantee rights for all its citizens, but that doesn't always happen in realityˇespecially if one is poor or disenfranchised," said Michael E. Tigar, the Edwin A. Mooers Scholar and professor of law, Washington College of Law at American University, when he spoke at Cardozo on "How Market Theory Distorts the Search for Justice," on the occasion of the first Jacob Burns Ethics Center Lecture.
Tigar is a well-known trial lawyer, activist, author, scholar, and teacher. His clients have included Angela Davis, t 46a he Chicago Seven, former Texas Governor John Connally, accused Nazi war criminal John Demjanjuk, and Oklahoma City bombing conspirator Terry Nichols.

Heyman Center Winter Lecture Series
Two well-known business leaders presented talks this February as part of The Heyman Center Winter Lecture Series. Ronald Stanton (in middle), chairman, Transammonia, and a YU Trustee, spoke on "Issues in International Arbitration," and Howard W. Lutnick (far left), president and CEO, Cantor Fitzgerald, discussed "Marketplaces, Exchanges, and Competition." Howard Abrahams '94 (at far right) helped organize the series.

Howard LutnickRonald Stanton

CORRECTION
A photo caption in the last issue of Cardozo Life mis-identified Michael Dowd, who was a panelist on "Neonaticide: The Psychiatric, Legal, and Ethical Dimensions in Defense of Women." 0