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around CAMPUS


Clinton Receives Advocate for Peace Award
Cardozo Publications Win Honors
New Teleconferencing Facility Expands Reach of “Wrongful Convictions” Course
Scholars Visit to Discuss Intellectual Property
Baseball and the Law, Followed by Baseball
Burns Ethics Center Fosters Dialogue on Critical Legal Issues
David Boies Gives Insider View on the Presidential Election

Negotiation Teams Win Regionals
Squadron Program Receives Grants
Cardozo Announces $25 Million Capital Campaign
Cardozo Begins 25th Anniversary Celebration
Students Raise $40,000 Towards Public Interest Stipends
AELJ Goes to the Grammy Awards
Intensive Trial Advocacy Program Held
Schuck Examines Diversity
Moot Court and Trial Teams Have Winning Year
Forum on Faith-Based Services and Charitable Choice
Jacob Burns Ethics Center Lecture
Kassin Addresses Police Interrogations and Confessions
Cardozo/BMI Moot Court Competition
Langfan Family Funds Oratorical Contest
Certificate in Dispute Resolution to Be Offered
Divorce, Victorian-Style Examined and Family Law Seminars Established
Alumni Perform at the Law Revue




Clinton Receives Advocate for Peace Award
President Clinton To a standing-room-only crowd of students and faculty who roared their enthusiastic greetings, former president William Jefferson Clinton strode onto the stage in the third floor lounge, where he was to receive the second annual Advocate for Peace Award given by the Cardozo Online Journal of Conflict Resolution (COJCR) and the International Law Students Association (ILSA). Mr. Clinton was selected by the students in these organizations for his efforts to promote peace in Ireland, Bosnia, Korea, and the Middle East. COJCR and ILSA created the award in 1999 to provide recognition and encouragement for the efforts of those in the international alternative dispute resolution community. And as explained by the students during the ceremony, the award is for those who “by their deeds and efforts sought peace.” The inaugural recipient was former ambassador Richard Holbrooke, who also attended this year’s event with his son.
In bestowing the engraved crystal plate to Mr. Clinton, Melissa Stewart, president of ILSA, and Peggy Sweeney, editor of COJCR, quoted Abraham Lincoln, who once said, “The best way to destroy an enemy is to make him a friend.” They continued, “We believe this describes Mr. Clinton’s approach to conflict resolution within the international arena. He brings people together. He puts people first." In his remarks, Dean Verkuil noted that the event drew criticism and protests as well as praise for the former president. However, he said, a law school “thrives on activism, controversy and scholarship … it makes better lawyers.”
Mr. Clinton’s speech was very well received by the audience of more than 300. Dean Verkuil closed the proceedings by thanking Mr. Clinton for “a spellbinding address … what we will remember from this afternoon’s talk is not your grasp of the facts, as dazzling as that is, but your humanity, your sense of purpose, your understanding that redemption on earth is possible.” Mr. Clinton started by quoting Justice Cardozo, who “once wrote that prosperity is in union, not division.” He tied that theme together with several others: the idea that we are all created equal and that no one has a monopoly on truth, emphasizing that peace requires letting go of old hatreds and requires the ability to visualize a future different from the past. He told personal stories of people from whom he learned important lessons in negotiating peace, including Nelson Mandela, King Hussein of Jordan, and Yitzak Rabin of Israel.
In discussing the Middle East conflict, he noted especially that he was “deeply disappointed” that he was unable in the end to convince the Palestinians and Israelis to make peace. To close his remarks, Mr. Clinton drew on the teachings of the three monotheistic religions that were born in the Middle East, saying, “When Christ was asked what is the greatest commandment, he said to love God with all your heart, and the second is like it, to love your neighbor as yourself. The Koran says that Allah put on earth different peoples, not that they might despise each other but that they might come to know each other and work together and live together. And the Torah says that he who turns aside from a stranger might as well turn aside from God. In the name of these faiths, people have fought each other over that tiny, sanctified, and sullied piece of land.” However, he continued, if you believe that “we are all children of God,  created equal … then everyone has a role to play [working for peace] and we will all be better when we help each other.”
He challenged the students and asked, “Do you believe that no one, even you, has the monopoly on truth? Do you have the strength of character, the wisdom, to let go? To realize that you are never going to get even and that every day you remain in the grip of a hatred is a day that you give up to your demons, giving them permission to steal your life away from you day by day by day? Can you imagine that tomorrow could be different? The degree to which young people like you, blessed with good minds, good fortunes, and good education, believe those things will determine the shape of the world we live in.”

Cardozo Publications Win Honors
CSL Catalog The student newspaper, The Cardozo Insider, received an Honorable Mention in the best newspaper Web site category by the New York Press Association’s annual Better College Newspaper Contest. The Cardozo bulletin, prepared by the Law School’s Office of Communications and Public Affairs and used by the Admissions Office in recruiting students, won a Bronze Award for exceptional quality, creativity, and message effectiveness from the Admissions Marketing Report Advertising Awards Competition.

New Teleconferencing Facility Expands Reach of “Wrongful Convictions” Course
Last February, as students began to enter the newly operational video conferencing classroom at Cardozo, they could see second- and third-year law students at Duke, Northwestern, Cooley, and Tennessee beginning to take seats in classrooms on their respective campuses. These other students were live on a screen at the front of the lecture hall. The occasion was the first meeting of Prof. Barry Scheck’s class Wrongful Convictions: Causes and Remedies.
When the clock read 4 p.m. exactly, Professor Scheck went to the podium and said to the audiences, “If you can hear us, wave enthusiastically.” The students on the various campuses began to wave. The months of planning by Professor Scheck and the Innocence Project staff in concert with YU’s facilities management team, MCI technicians, Prof. Lynn Wishart of the Chutick Law Library, and Cardozo administrators were bearing real fruit. Professor Scheck introduced the semester’s first lecturer, Richard A. Leo, professor of criminology, law & society and psychology and social behavior at the University of California, Irvine, and, according to Professor Scheck, the world’s leading expert on false confessions. At the end of Professor Leo’s talk, students on every campus had the opportunity to ask him questions. Each week, a world-class expert presented a live lecture at Cardozo, and students at the four other schools participated through video-conferencing technology.
This distance learning course, an interdisciplinary examination of the principal problems that lead to the conviction of the innocent and the leading proposals for social and judicial reform, is open to graduate students of law, journalism, psychology, and other related disciplines. It is a core offering for students participating in Innocence Projects that have been spawned at schools throughout the country. At least one faculty member supervises the class on each campus and leads in-class discussions, assigns and grades homework, and provides other professorial functions. The substance of the course, including readings, lectures, and online discussion, is provided by Cardozo. Among the topics covered were eyewitness identification, Habeas and post-conviction remedies, DNA evidence, snitches, junk science, ineffective counsel, police and prosecutorial misconduct, innocence and the death penalty, media and investigative journalism, and innocence and race.
The class calendar, syllabus, and all required readings were posted in electronic format on a password-protected site. In addition, readings for those interested in pursuing topics further, links to relevant Web sites, a national discussion forum for students, a discussion forum for professors involved in the course, and an area where students can ask lecturers questions were available. The course will be offered again this semester. A company that designs and builds educational Web sites for the legal community films each lecture and makes it available on the Web, where it can be downloaded. From these files, professors are able to burn a high-quality CD to show in class. Ultimately the lectures, complete with transcripts translated into several languages, will be offered online to the global community for CLE credit or general interest. More than 20 schools located throughout the United States offered all or part of the course.

Scholars Visit to Discuss Intellectual Property
At a series of events, eminent legal scholars continued to discuss and debate the evolution of intellectual property in the new global economy that increasingly treats information as a form of wealth as well as a social good. In March, “Intellectual Lawmaking in the New Millennium” focused on ways global elites are shaping world trade and intellectual property laws, perhaps at the cost of socioeconomic rights and national sovereignty, while in April, panelists offered provocative insights about how the Internet and new communications technologies have encouraged a convergence of copyright and communications policy that is increasingly evident in academic scholarship, legal practice, regulatory solutions, and attitudes toward Congress.
At the earlier conference, speakers expressed concern about the ways in which multilateral groups like the World Trade Organization (WTO) are driving domestic law and behavior. WTO’s agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) is based on “broadly delineated property rights,” said Gail Evans, a professor at the Southern Cross School of Law and Justice, New South Wales, Australia. She suggested that the agency incorporate workplace and environmental rights in its constitution to counterbalance the emphasis on property. Prof. John O. McGinnis said that such standards could become a source of protectionism and he was concerned that not enough has been done to consider how “we will restrain international organizations.…I look at the history of our own Constitution, and I see danger again.”
Prof. Wendy Gordon, Boston University School of Law, speaking at “Copyright Law as Communications Policy: Convergence of Paradigms and Cultures.”
Dean Verkuil with keynote speaker Geoffrey Sau Kuk Yu, assistant director general
Prof. Wendy Gordon, Boston University School of Law, speaking at “Copyright Law as Communications Policy: Convergence of Paradigms and Cultures.”
Dean Verkuil with keynote speaker Geoffrey Sau Kuk Yu, assistant director general,
World Intellectual Property Organization, at “World Trade, Intellectual Property, and the Global Elites: International Lawmaking in the New Millennium.”

Corporations increasingly are lobbying other  countries and international organizations to influence American laws and practices, said Marci A. Hamilton, Thomas H. Lee Chair in Public Law and director of Cardozo’s Intellectual Property Law Program. Thus, lobbyists may secure action from the European Union and then lobby Congress so the United States can “catch up.” As a result, the Supreme Court may someday confront the constitutionality of legislation that reflects other nations’ approach to intellectual property problems.
Hamilton said that the Napster dispute had solved “one of the most important issues in all of international property law—how to generate a debate about copyright.” She argued that copyright is a form of private censorship. “It is the ability to silence someone else, and we have to think carefully about when we do that and when we don’t.”
This was also among the concerns and themes of the April conference. Neil Weinstock Netanel of the University of Texas School of Law cited the example of an attempt by the heirs of Margaret Mitchell, the author of Gone With the Wind, to use their copyright protection against a retelling of the story from the viewpoint of a slave at Tara. “This issue raises serious questions of free speech,” he said.  Eugene Volkokh of the UCLA School of Law said that copyright restricts speech and should be accompanied by procedural safeguards like the ones used in the libel field. Jack Balkin of Yale Law School noted that information is a source of wealth, and there has been a tilt in favor of rights to hold information as property. Later in the day, Jessica Litman of the Wayne State University School of Law said that copyright holders prefer to sue intermediaries like Napster, but noncommercial users also may be vulnerable to infringement actions. “It’s become necessary to sell the notion that individuals who exchange music on the Internet are evil pirates,” she said. “That sure looks like the copyright police to me.”

Baseball and the Law, Followed by Baseball
An unusual conference attracted youngsters wearing baseball caps as well as the usual academics and practicing lawyers on a baseball-perfect spring day. The event gave fans of baseball and the law—described by Prof. Charles M. Yablon as the two most popular games in America —a rare opportunity to indulge their twin passions while earning a few continuing education credits in the bargain.
Prof. Robert Jarvis, Nova Southeastern University, surprised the audience when he appeared as the conference mascot, “Oliver Wendell Wolf.” The conference even had its own mascot, “Oliver Wendell Wolf,” in the person of Nova Southeastern University Professor of Law Robert M. Jarvis. After cavorting through the crowd, the costumed Jarvis discussed liability issues created by the proliferation of team mascots. For example, “Oriole Bird” has been accused of hitting a fan with his tail, and “Phillie Phanatic” was hauled into court for assaulting a customer during an appearance at a local paint store.
“Batter Up! From the Baseball Field to the Courthouse” was sponsored by the Cardozo Law Review and received support from Fred Wilpon and the New York Mets organization. It was organized by Dave Feuerstein ’01, who was a minor league ballplayer prior to coming to Cardozo. After a day of academic presentations and policy debates, participants happily adjourned to Shea Stadium for dinner and to watch the Mets defeat the Houston Astros, 8–2. In addition to exploring baseball as a metaphor, speakers discussed in great detail the legal and economic challenges facing baseball as a business, including changes wrought by the Internet, which Jack F. Williams of Georgia State University School of Law said have raised the issue of “who owns the back of the baseball card?”
Another session featured a panel of well-known baseball executives who discussed contract negotiations, stadium construction, and other current issues facing baseball. Thomas J. Ostertag, senior vice president and general counsel of Major League Baseball; Eugene D. Orza, associate general counsel for the Major League Players Association; David P. Samson ’93, executive vice president of the Montreal Expos; New York Times baseball writer Murray Chass; Steve Greenberg, former deputy commissioner of Major League Baseball and cofounder of the Classic Sports Network; and former baseball commissioner Fay Vincent lent validity and star quality to the day’s event.
Mr. Vincent said that intangible performance rights have opened up the prospect of “a spectacular future” for Major League Baseball, but “the baseball owners don’t believe in the future of their own game technologically or economically.” He suggested that the owners discuss the whole issue of revenue sharing with the players. “The history of American business has been that there has to be a sharing of ownership with the employees,” he said. “Down the road, the players will own a big piece of baseball.”

Burns Ethics Center Fosters Dialogue on Critical Legal Issues
Burt Neuborne Unless the voices of the poor are heard in the American legal system, “we cannot pretend to ourselves that we have an ethical system of justice,” the noted lawyer and activist Burt Neuborne told an audience of more than a hundred at the Third Annual Jacob Burns Ethics Center Lecture. Neuborne called for “a crusade” to improve the access of the poor to the system. That message has been taken to heart at Cardozo, where the Jacob Burns Center for Ethics in the Practice of Law honored Neuborne with its first Access to Justice Award.
The Center was established with the support of Jacob M. Burns, a lawyer and longtime chairman of Cardozo’s Board of Directors. Ellen Yaroshefsky, the director of the innovative Center, said that Mr. Burns was impressed by the success of the school’s trial advocacy program and wanted to apply its lessons to the teaching of ethics. Utilizing video simulations and drawing upon the expertise of lawyers and judges who are teaching fellows in the ethics program, the Burns Center has taught hundreds of students who become engaged in practice-based settings. “We grapple with some of the most difficult ethical and moral issues lawyers have to face,” said Professor Yaroshefsky.
Recently the Center has become more active in sponsoring programs, lectures, and conferences, covering topics that range from lawyer’s use of the media to DNA in the courtroom. This past fall, the Center held its first symposium, drawing together prosecutors, defense lawyers, judges, and social scientists to examine one of the most significant issues in the criminal justice system—the use of cooperating witnesses and informants. That symposium will be published and was solicited for online presentation for continuing legal education courses. According to Professor Yaroshefsky, ongoing work in this area will be the subject of occasional papers of the Ethics Center. Continuing its heavier agenda, the Center is scheduling conferences on DNA and privacy and lessons from the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission for the 2001–02 academic year, and is working with Fordham’s Louis Stein Center for Ethics to develop a manual for legal services attorneys. Professor Yaroshefsky sees Cardozo becoming a center for discussion and scholarship about critical ethical and moral issues in the delivery of legal services and the work of lawyers.
Professor Neuborne, the legal director of the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law, discussed his role in Velazquez v. Legal Services Corporation, a recent Supreme Court decision that overturned a 1996 congressional rule barring federally funded legal services attorneys from challenging existing law while advocating for public assistance recipients. The measure came as state and federal officials were instituting major welfare “reforms.” The regulation’s message to the poor, Professor Neuborne stated, was that “you could have half a lawyer.”
The Burns Ethics Center signed on to an amicus brief in the case, arguing that the restriction would compromise the lawyers’ effectiveness and was contrary to professional ethics codes. Professor Neuborne said that while the litigation worked its way through the courts, Cardozo provided “sanctuary” for several attorneys who could not use legal services offices to craft arguments for their clients but who also could not drop the cases. He also said that the Supreme Court decision, in freeing attorneys to argue against the status quo, created “a charter of rights for subsidized speech.” And its reasoning could be used as an argument to remove other restrictions on representation of the poor. “The poor are entitled to [legal] advice just like the rich,” he said.

David Boies Gives Insider View on the Presidential Election
David Boies David Boies, champion in the US Supreme Court for presidential candidate Al Gore, delivered the keynote address and shared his insights on Bush v. Gore at a daylong conference, “Votes and Voices: Revaluations in the Aftermath of the 2000 Presidential Election.” Other presentations challenged or defended the legitimacy of Bush’s presidency, discussed the electoral college, and mused about the state of public discourse in America. Mr. Boies discussed the Supreme Court’s ruling that the recounts sought by Gore violated the Constitution’s Equal Protection Clause and noted that everybody was surprised by the justices’ “newfound affinity” for that clause. Bush v. Gore was one of the Supreme Court’s really bad decisions, he noted, akin to the Dred Scott ruling, which ratified slavery. But, he added that the ruling could possibly have a “silver lining”; future justices might find some good in the precedent. Besides, he said, “there is an enormous amount of good will toward the Court. It’s not unlimited, but it can stand a case like this every 50 to 60 years.”
He noted that the American people accepted the Court’s decision because they have confidence in the integrity of the system. They wanted to see it resolved and, he reminded the crowd, there will be another election in four years. He also commended the canvassers, both Democrats and Republicans, for “stepping up to their democratic duty to see that those votes were counted.” When an audience member asked him if he would have done anything differently with hindsight, Boies grinned and said he still has no idea what he could have done to change the justices’ minds. After his talk, Boies signed autographs and chatted with students and practitioners who thronged the stage to pay homage to this celebrity lawyer.
Other speakers conversed on the electoral college and the popular vote, with some using baseball analogies to explain the relationships between the two. Prof. Michael Herz noted that the winning team in the World Series is not the team that receives the most runs but the one that wins the most games. Alan Dershowitz of Harvard Law School insisted that the Court’s “corrupt” decision was motivated by partisan concerns. He said, “The only relevant fact in this case was the names of the litigants. The justices were determined to see George W. Bush elected President of the United States.” Nelson Lund of George Mason University School of Law disagreed. He thought Gore had engineered a biased recount. “The fact that the Court has been attacked so viciously tells us more about the Court’s critics than about the merits of its decision.”
The day’s third panel attempted to place the election dispute in the context of larger cultural and legal developments. Prof. Richard Weisberg spoke particularly of “Monicatalk,” or the privatization of public discourse. In a public opinion culture, private figures run the risk of being judged out of context, added Prof. Jay Rosen of George Washington University School of Law. However, the noted First Amendment lawyer Floyd Abrams said that he lives in a world where people are not engaged with public issues. “I wish people would raise their voices. I haven’t heard much debate since Bush became President.” The conference was organized by Professors Michael Herz and Richard Weisberg and was cosponsored by the Floersheimer Center for Constitutional Democracy and the Jacob Burns Institute for Advanced Legal Studies.

Negotiation Teams Win Regionals
David Koenig ’02 and Melissa Stewart ’02 won the ABA Regional Client Counseling Competition at Pace University School of Law. They went on to represent Cardozo at the National Finals in Sacramento, CA. In February, the Law School hosted the third annual ABA Regional Representation in Mediation Competition. Out of 12 competing teams from Buffalo, CUNY, Seton Hall, Syracuse, and Touro, the winners of the competition were two Cardozo teams: Darian Taylor ’01 and Sheree Gootzeit ’01 and Cynthia DeVasia ’02 and Jonas Karp ’02. They represented Cardozo in the finals held in Washington, D.C.

Squadron Program Receives Grants
This past fall, the Howard M. Squadron Program in Media, Law and Society received two grants from the Ford Foundation. The first grant of $45,000 funded a new seminar, Administrative Litigation and the FCC, as well as summer placements in media law. The second grant of $75,000 is for strengthening ties and encouraging further collaboration between Cardozo and the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy at the University of Oxford. The Squadron Program, again in conjunction with the Oxford Programme, received an award from USAID to evaluate media developments in the Ukraine. A three-person team spent one month in the Ukraine, assessing the structure of media institutions, relationships to government, and economic sustainability.

Cardozo Announces $25 Million Capital Campaign
Cardozo launched its first capital campaign with a phase one goal of $25 million. This is a small but significant part of Yeshiva University’s overall campaign, which has a $400 million goal. At the time of the announcement in June, 10 donors had committed gifts of $10 million or more, propelling the University’s campaign well over the halfway mark. As of the same date, Cardozo had received gifts and pledges totaling about $13 million—just a little more than half of the Law School’s goal. The monies are earmarked for scholarships, faculty support, and the renovation and expansion of the facility, including a new Jacob Burns Moot Court Room, expanded lobby and library, and renovated classrooms.

Cardozo Begins 25th Anniversary Celebration
Twenty-five years ago this September, Cardozo welcomed its first students. To begin the yearlong celebration of the 25th anniversary, a kickoff party for the entire Cardozo community is scheduled for September 6. The anniversary theme is taken from Justice Cardozo’s famous quote, “The cause of law is the welfare of society,” emblazoned on the wall sculpture that graces the school’s lobby. A series of conferences, galas, dinners, and other events, including the conferring of the Democracy Award, is planned to commemorate the Law School’s founding and achievements. All members of the Cardozo community are invited to participate and share in the celebration and special activities.

Students Raise $40,000 Towards Public Interest Stipends

Vivien Naim ’88 shows off one of the auction’s hot items—a Clinton-signed Cardozo Vivien Naim ’88 shows off one of the auction’s hot items—a Clinton-signed Cardozo sweatshirt. Auction items ranged from Broadway tickets to dinners with members of the faculty, to two Cardozo sweatshirts signed by former president Bill Clinton. Auctioneers were drawn from the faculty and administration, bidding was lively, and more than $15,000 was raised at the 9th Annual Goods and Services Auction presented by the Student Bar Association. In addition, an anonymous $25,000 donation was given, making a total of $40,000 raised for the Cardozo Public Interest Summer Stipend Program, which allowed 30 students to take summer positions in the public sector.


AELJ Goes to the Grammy Awards
AELJ at the Grammy Awards The Cardozo Arts & Entertainment Law Journal (AELJ) was awarded the contract to publish the winning papers associated with the Recording Academy’s 3rd Annual Entertainment Law Initiative Legal Writing Contest. The event, which is cosponsored by the American Bar Association, is part of the 43rd Annual GRAMMY® Week. As a result of this honor, AELJ editors Sarah Warren ’01 and Paulette Fox ‘01, shown here on the proverbial “red carpet,” attended the GRAMMY® Awards in Los Angeles.

Intensive Trial Advocacy Program Held

ITAP
Many Cardozo students say that one of the most rewarding and practical experiences of law school is participation in the Intensive Trial Advocacy Program (ITAP). Each year, more than 100 third-year students learn how to do opening statements, cross-examinations, closing arguments, and all phases of criminal and civil trials. About 200 visiting faculty give demonstrations and student critiques. Students are also videotaped to learn how to improve their courtroom style. The two-week program ends with a bench and jury trial before a practicing judge.

Schuck Examines Diversity
Dean Paul Verkuil, Prof. Peter Schuck and NYLS Dean Harry Wellington Dean Paul Verkuil, Prof. Peter Schuck of Yale Law School, and New York Law School Dean Harry Wellington
History offers few examples of cultures that value diversity, Peter Schuck, Simeon E. Baldwin Professor of Law, Yale Law School, told an audience at Cardozo. Schuck, who delivered the annual Bauer Memorial Lecture, said that although “mongrel cultures” based on trade are among history’s most dynamic and most successful, the spread of diversity usually has been marked by “countless blood-soaked battle monuments and endless graveyards.”
But there is one notable exception to this trend: today’s United States. “The abstract ideal of diversity, almost always ignored and opposed throughout human history, has now reached an apotheosis in the United States,” he said. Schuck, whose lecture represented a “preface” to an ongoing study of law and diversity, conceded that large-scale immigration in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries sparked debate about ethnic diversity in this country. Also, minority groups have frequently suffered repression, while “assimilationists” have sought to dissolve differences in favor of 100-percent Americanism.
Nevertheless, many Americans have come to value diversity as an end that private and public institutions should foster. In part, this may be explained by the fact that Americans have come to accept diversity as a demographic fact of life that cannot be reversed. They may wish there was less immigration but admire the immigrants they know personally. Labor unions that once fought the admission of people who would compete for a limited number of jobs now see immigrants as potential new members in a growing economy. And there is a collective guilt about past wrongs done to minority groups such as Jews, Native Americans, African Americans, and Asian Americans.
“Many Americans believe we can have it both ways, that the study, celebration, and maintenance of diverse traditions is compatible to assimilation to core American values,” Schuck said. A “mosaic” or a “lumpy chef’s salad” has replaced the “melting pot” as the favored metaphor in describing the relationship of ethnic groups to American society. The struggle of African Americans for equal treatment has provided a template for the political struggles of other ethnic groups. Meanwhile, new technologies have familiarized people with diversity in its most attractive forms. This is “diversity on the cheap and without risk.”


Moot Court and Trial Teams Have Winning Year
The Moot Court Honor Society has compiled an impressive record this year. At the Irving R. Kaufman Memorial Securities Law Competition sponsored by Fordham Law School, the team of Shannon Boettjer ’02 and Nick Lagemann ’02 advanced to the “Sweet Sixteen” round. In the Tulane Invitational National Sports Law Competition, Tyler Lenane ’02 and Jessica Prunell ’02 advanced to the “Great Eight” round. Mary Alestra ’01 and Alan Gotthelf ’01 advanced to the semifinal round and won runner-up for Best Brief at the Ruby R. Vale Corporate Moot Court Competition. The Cardozo Trial Team won the American Trial Lawyers Association Regional Competition, beating 21 other schools. Team members were Mary Alestra ’01, John Coyle ’01, Alydra Kelly ’02, and Jennifer Loyd ’01. At the National Trial Competition in New Orleans, Cardozo ranked ninth. It was the first Cardozo team to reach the national competition.

Forum on Faith-Based Services and Charitable Choice
Forum on Faith-Based Services and Charitable Choice In April, the Burns Ethics Center convened a “Forum on Faith-Based Services and Charitable Choice.” (From left) Ellen Willis, director, NYU Cultural Journalism Program and fellow, Nation Institute; Prof. Ellen Yaroshefsky, director, Jacob Burns Ethics Center; and Prof. David Cole, Georgetown University Law Center, author of No Equal Justice. Other panelists were Rev. Cheryl Anthony, senior pastor and CEO, Judah International Christian Center, and vice chair, Board of Central Brooklyn Churches, and Steven Sheinberg, assistant director, legal affairs, Anti-Defamation League.

Jacob Burns Ethics Center Lecture
Burt Neuborne, John Norton Pomeroy Professor of Law and legal director, the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law, delivered the Jacob Burns Ethics Center Lecture “Access to Justice: the Courtroom as Forum.”

Kassin Addresses Police Interrogations and Confessions
Saul Kassin At an event heavily attended by legal aid attorneys and defense lawyers, Saul Kassin (at right), professor of psychology, Williams College, and Prof. Jonathan Oberman spoke on “Police Interrogations and Confessions: Evaluation of a Defendant’s Statement and the Limitations of the Law.”

Cardozo/BMI Moot Court Competition
Every year, the Moot Court Honor Society coordinates the prestigious Cardozo/BMI Moot Court Competition. BMI, an organization dedicated to the protection of the rights of writers, composers, and publishers of music, hosts a reception for the competing teams. (From left) Lisa Tuntigian ’01; Nick Lagemann ’02; Abagail Goldenberg ’01; Gordon Novod ’01; Christophe DiFalco ’01; Judith Safer, assistant general counsel, BMI; Christopher Lick ’02; Steven Gonzalez ’02; and Shannon Boettjer ’02.
BMI

Langfan Family Funds Oratorical Contest
Erica Sleschinger The Moot Court Honor Society hosted the First Annual Langfan Family Constitutional Oratorical Prize Contest—an intramural competition open to all Cardozo students. The topic was the meaning of the Second Amendment in contemporary America. Erica Sleschinger ’02 (at left) won first place ($3,000) for best orator; Jason Halper ’01 won second place ($1,000); and third place ($500) went to David Foox ’01. Four alumni were judges. The Langfan Prize Fund was established by William K. Langfan and his family, including Robin Langfan Hammer ’86 and Dayna Langfan ’87.

Langfan Family Contest
(From left) Michelle Ricardo ’02; Bonnie Steingart ’79; Hon. David A. Gross ’87, Nassau County District Court; Evan Rosen ’02; Bruce Lederman ’79; David Lorretto ’01; Pery Krinsky ’01; Erica Sleschinger ’02; Lisa Tuntigian ’01; Jason Halper ’01; Benjamin Mantell ’03; Robin Langfan Hammer ’86; William K. Langfan; Gordon Novad ’01; Dayna Langfan ’87; David Foox ’01 (LL.M.); Hon. John Garrett Marks ’79; Nassau County District Court; Mark Langfan, Esq.

Certificate in Dispute Resolution to Be Offered
Both J.D. and LL.M. students will be able to receive a Certificate in Dispute Resolution after participating in a newly approved program that integrates the study of theory and policy with performance and practical skills around conflict resolution processes. Students will have to satisfy competency requirements in five categories of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR)-related skills: ADR Processes, Interviewing and Counseling, Negotiation, Mediation, and Arbitration, and satisfy a writing and clinical or externship requirement. The program is supported by a generous grant from the Kukin Family Foundation.

Divorce, Victorian-Style Examined and Family Law Seminars Established
Stanley and Gloria Plesent with Prof. Monroe Price (right). Literature buffs and family law attorneys gathered at the New York Bar Association to discuss divorce law and religious and domestic attitudes depicted in the novels of Anthony Trollope, whose books are famous for their accurate and vivid portrayals of society in Victorian England. The lecture, delivered by Valentine Cunningham of Oxford University, “He Knew He Was Right: Family Law in Trollope and Victorian Fiction,” was also an occasion to honor Adjunct Prof. Stanley Plesent on the establishment of the Stanley and Gloria Plesent Seminars in Family Law at Cardozo.

Alumni Perform at the Law Revue
Alumni came back to campus to perform; students parodied their teachers and the Law School; and faculty gave it back at the fun-filled annual Law Revue Show.Alumni at the Law Revue