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Blueprint
CARDOZO


Enjoying a Transformation

As Cardozo begins its 25th anniversary year, the Law School is in the midst of a multiyear, multifacility renovation and expansion.
Yeshiva University’s Brookdale Center has been home to the Law School since Cardozo’s founding in 1976. At the end of the 1990s, the Cardozo Board and administration, working with the University administration, developed a major capital improvement plan, which has been in process since 1998. First, the School acquired housing for approximately 130 students and purchased an additional two floors—making a total of 11 floors—at the Brookdale Center. Then, through a careful sequencing of projects, the renovation, redecorating, and upgrading of all the facilities began. Progress has been swift, with little disruption to students and classes as 55 Fifth Avenue undergoes a transformation, which includes technological enhancements and new heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems.
The University is working with two major architectural firms—Davis Brody Bond and Schuman Lichtenstein Claman Efron—under the guidance of a Cardozo Board committee chaired first by Sheldon Solow and now by Stephen Siegel, both of whom are major figures in New York real estate.
The centerpiece of the renovation is a larger and reconfigured first floor, which will include a new Jacob Burns Moot Court Room, a larger lobby, a new facade, and a 59-seat seminar room. Work on the first floor began in the summer of 2001 and should be completed before the beginning of the 2002 academic year. Davis Brody Bond has designed this floor and supplied the renderings that follow. The financing for the capital project will in part be raised through Cardozo’s $25 million capital campaign, which was announced in spring 2001.
The Law School has grown and been consolidated onto 11 contiguous floors, giving its vertical campus an orderly layout and making floors accessible by stairs and elevators. To accomplish this, the University first purchased and renovated the 11th floor of the Brookdale Center, which now accommodates the Law School’s clinics, the admissions office, and the Center for Professional Development. Then, it took over the 9th floor, which has been renovated to increase the size of the library and to provide offices for faculty and student journals. The library space houses additional book stacks and 10 new comfortable student study rooms and areas. An interior staircase leads to the three other floors of the library. The 9th floor will be fully open in fall 2001. The 10th floor, which is home to the dean’s office, student services including financial aid and the registrar, public relations, and development, was renovated during the spring and summer and will be reoccupied in the fall.



5th Ave. View
FIFTH AVENUE FACADE AND ENTRANCE

Cardozo’s lobby will grow to accommodate the space that is now rented by Metro Drugs, which is moving in October. The main entrance to the Law School will move towards 12th Street. New windows will be placed on the first and second floors of the building, both on Fifth Avenue and 12th Street. According to Lewis Davis of Davis Brody Bond, the design will “provide the school with a strong academic identity, a sense of university life, and a welcoming public space.” The name of the school will be carved into the exterior stone pediment that separates the 1st and 2nd floors.

LOBBY VIEW FACING EAST
NEW WINDOWS FACE 12TH STREET
New Moot Court

The new, grand lobby space will surround a circular Jacob Burns Moot Court Room that will physically become the heart of the Law School. A ramp will lead to the Court Room entrance. It has been designed as a campus center, a quadrangle for an urban building. The lobby space will have flexible seating that encourages an interchange of ideas and can accommodate up to 160 people at banquets and hundreds at receptions.


NEW CLASSROOMS

New Classrooms
Over the course of the project, classrooms are being renovated and updated, as are the ventilation and air conditioning systems for each floor. Six lecture halls have now been fitted with new chairs, desk tops with electrical outlets for laptops, and other technological enhancements, including video
conferencing equipment.


JACOB BURNS MOOT COURT ROOM
New Moot Court

The central “eye” is the new Jacob Burns Moot Court Room, which measures in excess of 4,000 square feet.  It will function as a classroom/lecture hall with tiered fixed-desk seating to accommodate 150 students. For larger assemblies, additional seating can be added to accommodate as many as 250, the approximate size of an entering class of students. The front of the room is designed to accommodate a judge’s bench, witness stand, attorney tables and a 12-person jury box. A control room will accommodate audio and visual equipment for four remotely controlled courtroom cameras, video monitors, and video teleconferencing and post-production equipment. A 59-seat seminar room will be added to the lobby level, in the space previously occupied by student lockers.


11TH FLOOR
Students on 11th Floor 11th Floor Clinics

As Cardozo begins its 25th anniversary year, the Law School is in the midst of a multiyear, multifacility renovation and expansion.
Yeshiva University’s Brookdale Center has been home to the Law School since Cardozo’s founding in 1976. At the end of the 1990s, the Cardozo Board and administration, working with the University administration, developed a major capital improvement plan, which has been in process since 1998. First, the School acquired housing for approximately 130 students and purchased an additional two floors—making a total of 11 floors—at the Brookdale Center. Then, through a careful sequencing of projects, the renovation, redecorating, and upgrading of all the facilities began. Progress has been swift, with little disruption to students and classes as 55 Fifth Avenue undergoes a transformation, which includes technological enhancements and new heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems.
The University is working with two major architectural firms—Davis Brody Bond and Schuman Lichtenstein Claman Efron—under the guidance of a Cardozo Board committee chaired first by Sheldon Solow and now by Stephen Siegel, both of whom are major figures in New York real estate.
The centerpiece of the renovation is a larger and reconfigured first floor, which will include a new Jacob Burns Moot Court Room, a larger lobby, a new facade, and a 59-seat seminar room. Work on the first floor began in the summer of 2001 and should be completed before the beginning of the 2002 academic year. Davis Brody Bond has designed this floor and supplied the renderings that follow. The financing for the capital project will in part be raised through Cardozo’s $25 million capital campaign, which was announced in spring 2001.
The Law School has grown and been consolidated onto 11 contiguous floors, giving its vertical campus an orderly layout and making floors accessible by stairs and elevators. To accomplish this, the University first purchased and renovated the 11th floor of the Brookdale Center, which now accommodates the Law School’s clinics, the admissions office, and the Center for Professional Development. Then, it took over the 9th floor, which has been renovated to increase the size of the library and to provide offices for faculty and student journals. The library space houses additional book stacks and 10 new comfortable student study rooms and areas. An interior staircase leads to the three other floors of the library. The 9th floor will be fully open in fall 2001. The 10th floor, which is home to the dean’s office, student services including financial aid and the registrar, public relations, and development, was renovated during the spring and summer and will be reoccupied in the fall.


RESIDENCE HALL
Residence Hall As Cardozo grew to accommodate its growing roster of faculty,Residence Hall Interior larger curriculum, and new programs, it was decided that housing was also needed,Residence Hall Interior especially for first-year students. In 1998, YU purchased the majority of shares in a co-op building located less than a block from the Cardozo campus. Today the Law School is able to offer housing on one of the most attractive residential streets in Manhattan to approximately 130 students each year. As a result, students from across the country find it easier to attend Cardozo and no longer have to tackle New York’s
residential housing maze.