5cb Alumni News and Notes 1000
news & notes
ALUMNI

Tributes, a Wine Tasting, Seminars, and Reunions Add to Campus Life
Lieberman and Weiss Join Board
New Alumni Director Starts
United States Supreme Court Group Admission
Graduates Direct Funds to Bet Tzedek
New Cardozo Alumni Association Officers
Letters

Tributes, a Wine Tasting, Seminars, and Reunions Add to Campus Life
Alumni were back on campus this fall to serve as mentors to current students, see old classmates, and pay tribute to Cardozo's deans. A cocktail party held in October honored deans Paul Verkuil and Michael Herz for achievements during their tenures. The theme, "Fighting for Cardozo's Future," was carried through with music from the film Rocky and antique English boxing gloves for each dean. Deans Paul Verkuil and Michael Herz
A holiday wine tasting and networking party at Union Square Wines in early December brought NYC alums together to sample nine wines. The event was so well attended that it was standing room only.
Laurence Gottlieb '93, Marc Mukasey '93, Nikiforos Mathews '96, Joel Schmidt '96, Craig Warkol '99, and Susan Schwab '00 spoke to current students about their post graduate clerkship experiences and encouraged them to pursue this rewarding opportunity. At a luncheon for students, Donald Scherer '93, CEO of Crossborder Solutions, discussed various aspects of life at an Internet company and how the study of law provides a useful backround for business. Alumni Association Chair Joshua Sohn '97 reserved the conference room, which was filled to capacity, at Piper Marbury Rudnick & Wolfe, L.L.P. for an alumni breakfast; Howard Abrahams '94 brought in Bradford Hildebrandt of Hildebrandt, Inc. to speak. Mr. Hildebrandt, who has been a consultant to many of the recent law firm mergers around the world, discussed significant aspects of law firm strategies, mergers and acquisitions, practice management, partner and associate compensation structures, and New York City real estate leases. Three student organizations hosted their annual reunions this fall. BALLSA gave a cocktail party with live music. The Arts & Entertainment Law Journal held its annual dinner following the Tenzer Distinguished lecture, featuring Q. Todd Dickinson, under secretary of commerce for intellectual property and director of the US Patent Office. The annual Law Review alumni party was held at the Manhattan Penthouse, bringing together professors, alumni, and current students.
 
 
Vivien Naim and Howard Leib (From left) Vivien Naim '88, Howard Lieb '83, Melanie Leslie '91, Lisa Foy '93, Maxine Stein '94, Robert Bernstein '95, Tricia Pantzer '95, Dean Verkuil, Dean Herz, Lawrence Klein '94.
Aliya Nelson and Samuel Tsegaye (From left) Aliya Nelson '01, Samuel Tsegaye '02, Michelle Ricardo '02, and John Potter '00 at BALLSA reunion. 

Lieberman and Weiss Join Board
 At the annual Board of Directors dinner new board members Mark Lieberman '84 and Stephen Weiss '90 were introduced. Chairman Earle Mack presented Dean Verkuil with a Baccarat crystal gavel to 1000 commemorate his tenure as dean. The highlight of the evening featured Prof. Larry Cunningham '88, who gave a preview of his new book, How to Think Like Benjamin Graham and Invest Like Warren Buffett.
 
Chairman Earle Mack and Mark Lieberman '84 Chairman Earle Mack and Mark Lieberman '84
Stephen Weiss, Rachel Warren and Prof. Larry Cunningham Stephen Weiss '90, Rachel Warren '92, and
Prof. Larry Cunningham '88
Lisa Foy '93, Josh Sohn '97 and YU President Norman Lamm Lisa Foy '93, Josh Sohn '97, and YU President Norman Lamm

New Alumni Director Starts
Barbara BirchBarbara A. Birch was named director of alumni affairs and started at Cardozo on January 2. For the past four years, she has been at Hofstra University School of Law, most recently as assistant dean for law alumni affairs. In that position, she had responsibility for alumni programming and the annual fund. She is currently studying at Hofstra for an MBA in marketing and anticipates graduating in May 2002. She holds a BA summa cum laude from State University of New York at Binghamton.

United States Supreme Court Group Admission
Be admitted to the US Supreme Court with fellow Cardozo alumni. Join us in Washington, DC on March 27, 2001, for the swearing-in ceremony and to hear oral arguments. For more information and to make a reservation, call Barbara Birch, director of alumni affairs, at 212-790-0298. Space is limited.

New Cardozo Alumni Association Officers
 The Cardozo Alumni Association elected new officers in June 2000. They are Joshua Sohn '97, chair; Lisa Foy '93, senior vice chair; Stephanie Gayden '93, program vice chair; Tricia Cohen Pantzer '98, treasurer; Robert Bernstein '95, corresponding secretary; and Lawrence Klein '94, recording secretary. The Executive Committee is looking for volunteers to serve on the following standing committees: CLE-Career Development, Student Relations, Non-Legal Attorneys, and Outreach. To volunteer, contact the Office of Alumni Affairs at 212-790-0298. Donna Costa '87 and James E. Schwalbe '93 have been named chairs for the 2001 Alumni Annual Fund. Special thanks to Stephen A. Weiss '90 and Christopher A. Seeger '90 for their superb leadership during the past two academic years. Alumni who want to assist with this year's annual fund should contact the Office of Alumni Affairs at 212-790-0298.

Graduates Direct Funds to Bet Tzedek

(From left) Prof. Toby Golick, Rochelle Feder Hansen '79, Dean Verkuil, and Joel Strauss '92.Prof. Toby Golick and Rochelle Feder Hansen
Two Cardozo graduates were co-lead counsel in a securities class action suit and have directed $50,000 from the settlement to the Bet Tzedek Legal Clinic. Joel Strauss '92 of Kaplan, Kilsheimer & Fox LLP and Rochelle Feder Hansen '79 of Bernstein Litowitz Berger & Grossmann LLP represented plaintiffs/shareholders in an alleged stock market fraud. They were successful in negotiating a favorable settlement for the victims. After distributing the monies to class members at a rate of 110% of their losses there was money remaining in the settlement fund. According to the terms of the settlement, those monies would be distributed to consumer advocacy organizations in accordance with the cy pres doctrine."Rochell 1000 e and I discussed beneficiaries; we recognized the good work that Bet Tzedek does, and as alumni of Cardozo we thought this would be an appropriate organization," said Joel. Toby Golick, director of the clinic, commented: "$50,000 is a significant donation and can positively impact the work we do here. It means a lot to us that Cardozo alums are responsible for this donation."
 

Letters

Another Tribute to Morris Abram
    After reading [Dean Verkuil's] tribute to Morris Abram in the Summer 2000 issue of Cardozo Life (p.15), I wanted to share with you an encounter I had with Morris near the end of his life.
    In the fall of 1999, I was invited by Morris's son and daughter-in-law to their home for dinner. Upon arriving, I was introduced to Morris, who was, according to his daughter-in-law, "also a lawyer." Exhausted from a full day at work, and somewhat regretting having accepted a mid-week dinner invitation, I sat down with Morris in a corner of the living room and prepared to make small talk until dinner was served.
    What followed was one of the most engaging and memorable conversations I have had with anyone (much less a brand-new acquaintance) in a very long time. In the span of a half-hour or so, we covered a wide range of topics, including the practice of law, classical music, and the influence of MTV on popular culture! When he learned I had graduated from Cardozo, Morris asked many questions about the current status of the school, its faculty, and my experience there.
    I thought about my conversation with Morris for many days. Apart from the diverse and stimulating topics we covered, I felt privileged to have met one of the founding forces behind a school at which I spent three of the most challenging and enjoyable years of my life.
    Perhaps for Morris there was a feeling as well of having come full circle. When I mentioned to Morris's son several days later how very much I had enjoyed talking with his father, his son replied that Morris had told him that his conversation with me somehow had made worthwhile all the effort he had put in to help establish Cardozo many years ago.
    When I learned of his death, I felt both a deep pang of sadness and a gratefulness that I'd had the opportunity to meet such an extraordinary person, if only briefly. Reading your tribute to Morris revived those feelings for me and prompted me to offer a tribute of my own to a remarkable man.
- Jennifer Newcomb '97
Letter from Sarajevo
    I'm a law clerk at an international court, The Human Rights Chamber, which was set up under the Dayton Peace Accord. It hears claims of human rights violations arising under the European Convention of Human Rights that have occurred since the signing of the Dayton Peace Accord (December 14, 1995) to the present. The court meets for one week every month and is made up of 14 judges: six are national (two Bosnian, two Croatian, and two Serbian) and eight are international, from all over Europe. Most of the cases involve property issues: People are trying to get their homes back. The court also hears cases regarding treatment of war criminals, frozen bank accounts, and religious property destroyed during the war, as well as ones involving labor rights, discrimination, fair trials, pensions, etc. The law clerks- about five international lawyers paid by our respective governments- prepare the cases and draft memoranda and decisions for the judges to review. We present the cases, they question us, discuss the cases, and then make decisions on them.
    It is very interesting to watch the international community immerse itself so completely in the rebuilding of Bosnia and Herzegovina. It is particularly interesting for me to observe the international community's work in an area where there has been 29d an extreme case of ethnic conflict resulting in what was essentially ethnic cleansing. One of the main objectives of Dayton is to reverse the effects of the cleansing. However, the country is divided between the groups- each with much local autonomy- and the federal government is very weak. Accordingly, it is an uphill battle.
    The court has issued approximately 500 decisions in the five years it has been in existence and has about 4,500 cases pending. I guess the question remains whether it is really possible to impose consensus from the outside. I suppose only time will tell.
- Sheri Rosenberg '94
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