Dean Diller Receives AALS Rhode Award for Achievement in Public Service

Recognizing Dean Matthew Diller’s leadership in legal education and public service, the AALS Section on Pro Bono and Public Service Opportunities awarded him with the 2014 Deborah L. Rhode Award. Dean Diller has a decades-long record of distinguished work in public service, which includes legal representation, scholarly research, public advocacy, and innovative leadership in legal education.

Supreme Court Rules in Favor of Professor Dan Ravicher's Challenge to Gene Patents

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in a major case that invalidates patents on two genes associated with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. The case was brought by Professor Dan Ravicher of Cardozo School of Law, along with the ACLU.

"NYC Project Shows Value of Legal Aid in Immigration Court": Professor Peter Markowitz Quoted in Crime and Justice News

Crime and Justice News - “No family can have a loved one locked up and deported, simply because they can’t afford counsel,” says Peter Markowitz, director of the Immigration Justice Clinic at Cardozo School of Law. “That’s not justice, and we don’t do that in New York.”

Vice Dean Myriam Gilles' Article Identified As One of Best Works of Recent Scholarship Relating to Courts Law

Vice Dean Myriam Gilles' article The Day Doctrine Died: Private Arbitration and the End of Law was identified as one of the best works of recent scholarship relating to courts law in Jotwell: The Journal of Things We Like (Lots).

"Bitcoin Industry to Legislators: Lay Off Miners, Multisig Wallets" - Professor Aaron Wright Quoted in American Banker

American Banker - Many businesses involved in bitcoin or other virtual currencies are "just a conduit," said Aaron J. Wright, a professor at the Cardozo Law School who penned a Medium post last year on the topic. "They just pass it along."

"Drug Abuse is No Crime" - Professor Ekow Yankah Featured in Valley News Editorial

Valley News - Ekow Yankah, a professor at Cardozo School of Law in New York, pointed out that crack has long been viewed as “the black drug” that infects only minority communities. Except for making a lot arrests and putting people behind bars for long stretches, “we did nothing about it,” he said.

Professor Marci Hamilton, Leading Church-State and Constitutional Law Scholar and Advocate for Women’s and Children’s Rights, Retires from Cardozo School of Law Faculty

Professor Marci Hamilton, the founder of Cardozo’s highly successful Intellectual Property Law Program, a highly regarded professor of constitutional law, constitutional litigator, and one of the nation’s leading church-state scholars and advocates for women’s and children’s rights, has announced her retirement from the full-time faculty of Cardozo School of Law.

Professor Richard Weisberg's Work with U.S. Commission on the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad Appears in Ukrainian Newspaper

An article detailing Professor Richard Weisberg's participation in an event rededicating a Jewish cemetary in Ukraine appeared in the Hope newspaper in August. Professor Weisberg's involvement was part of his work for the U.S. Commission on the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad. See below for the translated version of the article.

Professor Deborah Pearlstein: Fifteen Years After 9/11 Legal Complexities Remain

It is not the case that courts always defer in wartime or executives always seek and invariably receive greater power or that war, the modern counterterrorism war, could never end. The story is more complex and its details going forward depend very much on what we choose.

Should We Let Artificial Intelligence Be Our Ghostwriter? Professor Brett Frischmann Writes on the Dangers of Smart Technology

It turns out that putting our social interactions on autopilot can leach away the very things that make us human to begin with. At the extreme, using AI to make our social lives more “efficient” just might corrode them beyond recognition.