Cardozo Bench Marks: When the Supreme Court Has Only Eight Members



Apr 20, 2016

With the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, Cardozo professors Michael Herz, Kate Shaw, and David Rudenstine discuss how having an even number of justices impacts the United States Supreme Court.


Read Full Story

  • Showing: 5-5 of 5
  • Pages:
  • 5
  •  
Format: 2016-07
May 11, 2016

Newsweek - For months, Wildes had been working with Gulab, and he’d made several useful contacts in Kabul and Asadabad. The Afghan hadn’t worked for the U.S. military long enough to qualify for the Special Immigrant Visa program. But thanks to the lawyer and one of his contacts, the U.S. Embassy in Kabul sent a recommendation to the State Department, saying it was in the U.S. national interest to settle Gulab in America.

May 11, 2016

Philadelphia Inquirer - "It was designed to be a whitewash and it is a whitewash," Stewart E. Sterk, professor at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law in New York, said of the report. "It's disingenuous to the extreme. The report takes at face value anything that the trust says."

May 10, 2016

The National Law Journal - “The biggest story in Justice Index 2016 is about the progress courts are making to help people without lawyers,” said David Udell, executive director of the center, which is housed at Yeshiva University Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. “Nothing replaces the role of a lawyer, but with judicial leadership, many states are pursuing common-sense reforms to help poor Americans in civil cases.”

May 7, 2016

Boston Globe - "States have taken two basic approaches to changing their statutes of limitations to allow new cases, said Marci Hamilton, a professor at the Cardozo School of Law in New York."

May 6, 2016

The Global Legal Post - A leading fashion lawyer has won the Luxury Law Summit's Lifetime Achievement award.

May 4, 2016

U.S. News & World Report: "There's been a retreat" in the courts, says Michel Rosenfeld, a professor at Cardozo Law School. "It used to be that the federal government, through court decisions, was expanding rights to everybody, even in states where there was resistance."

The Cardozo Office of Communications & Public Affairs

lawpr@yu.edu

212.790.0237