Cardozo's Intensive Trial Advocacy Program (ITAP)



Jan 08, 2016

January 8, 2016 - This January, 72 Cardozo students are taking part in the annual Intensive Trial Advocacy Program. They learn from 134 faculty members and ten judges from the New York City region and across the country. During the program, students take on a role as prosecutor and defense attorney, in one of the most successful trial lawyer boot camps in any law school in the country.


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Mar 10, 2016

The Daily Beast - In fact, the DA’s office was so hell-bent on keeping Wright in prison that it fought to prevent DNA testing from even taking place originally. It took attorneys from the Innocence Project at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law in New York nine years of legal wrangling (all the way up to the Pennsylvania Supreme Court) to get prosecutors to drop their objections.

Mar 9, 2016

Forbes - Felix Wu, professor of law at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law tells me “Unlike Europe, the US does not have comprehensive privacy regulation, but this may actually make things more difficult for companies, which must comply with a patchwork of varying state and federal laws.”

Mar 9, 2016

New York Law Journal - Instead of condemning or celebrating the Liang verdict, we would be better served by learning how to have the challenging conversation about racial inequality in policing and the criminal justice system that the Liang case demands.

Mar 7, 2016

The National Law Journal has ranked Cardozo School of Law as one of the top U.S. law schools supplying associates to the nation's largest law firms.

Mar 4, 2016

New York Times - However, the dismissal of charges does not undo the damage to the reputations of the so-called Brownsville Five, teenagers ages 14 to 18, including one who is my client. Because they were tried in adult court, their names were made public and were reported widely in the news media, smearing them for the rest of their lives.

Mar 3, 2016

NPR - Cardozo law professor Christopher J. Buccafusco, who specializes in art law, copyright and intellectual property, understands the anger. “It’s a weird situation. People intuitively feel that it’s anticompetitive and immoral, but this sort of thing is intellectual property. When people invent stuff that’s new they get to have exclusive control over it. Often we think that’s a good thing.”

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